Ken Setiawan

Dr Ken Setiawan is a McKenzie Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Melbourne's Asia Institute.

Indonesia has taken a leading role in the promotion of human rights at the level of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). To what extent does the development of regional mechanisms mean that human rights are accepted in the region? How does Indonesia’s support for a regional mechanism relate to its domestic human rights challenges? Dr Ken Setiawan discusses these issues and more with Associate Professor Dinna Wisnu in Talking Indonesia this week.

While Indonesia has seen a decline in state violence since the collapse of the New Order, non-state violence, particularly toward minorities, appears to have increased. This has contributed to restriction of civil liberties, and poses challenges for democratic reform. In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Ken Setiawan chats to Dr Budi Hernawan about the shrinking space for civil liberties.

Last week, the Supreme Audit Agency (BPK) released a report confirming what many in the human rights community had suspected for years – members of the National Commission on Human Rights (Komnas HAM) have been embezzling public funds. Dr Ken Setiawan looks at the factors within Komnas HAM that have allowed this to occur.

What roles are played by religion and culture in perceptions of disability in Indonesia and how do these perceptions influence policy? What is being done, or should be done, to promote inclusion of people with disability? In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Ken Setiawan discusses these issues and more with leading disability advocate Slamet Thohari, from Brawijaya University in Malang, East Java.

Indonesia’s indigenous peoples face serious challenges, including insecure rights to land and lack of recognition of their traditional religions. How are these issues being addressed, and what regional differences have to be taken into account? Dr Ken Setiawan explores these questions and more with Sandra Moniaga, from Komnas HAM, in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

How free is the Indonesian press? How does the concentration of media ownership affect journalists and audiences? And how are digital technologies transforming the media landscape? Dr Ken Setiawan chats to Dr Ross Tapsell about these issues and more in Talking Indonesia.

Rapid urbanisation poses many challenges for Indonesian policy makers, including traffic congestion, pollution, and a lack of parks and green space. How have Indonesian leaders responded to these challenges? What has been done to address heritage conservation amid this rapid change? In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Ken Setiawan discusses these issues and more with Professor Widjaja Martokusumo.

Since the advent of democracy, Islam has become increasingly visible in Indonesian society and politics. But the electoral success of Islamic parties remains limited. How does this compare with the experiences of other Muslim-majority countries? Will Islamic parties ever be able to dominate Indonesian politics? Dr Ken Setiawan chats to Professor Vedi Hadiz about these issues and more in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Despite the many problems of its domestic leagues, Indonesia has a strong and passionate football fan culture. Who exactly supports football and in what ways? What can be done to improve the game, for supporters and players? Dr Ken Setiawan discusses these issues and more with Dr Andy Fuller in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

Indonesian cinema is beginning to make a mark on the world stage, with dozens of films competing in international festivals over recent years. What are the main challenges faced by Indonesian filmmakers? How can these problems be addressed, and what moves, if any, has the government made to strengthen the industry? Dr Ken Setiawan discusses these issues and more with Dr Gaston Soehadi in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Why do Indonesians migrate? And how do women – the majority of Indonesian migrants – maintain links with their home country? Dr Ken Setiawan speaks to Dr Monika Winarnita about these issues and more in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Last week, pressure from mass organisations forced the cancellation and relocation of the Belok Kiri Fest, a cultural event that aimed to challenge dominant discourses of Indonesian history. Dr Ken Setiawan writes that the incident is the latest example of the ongoing repression of alternative discourses on leftism and the events of 1965 in democratic Indonesia.