Jokowi’s early lead has vanished, and now this polarising presidential election is too close to call, says Dave McRae.

How voters respond to the spoken, and unspoken, language of masculinity permeating the Indonesian campaign will provide a telling glimpse into the national mindset, argues Hani Yulindrasari.

One candidate accuses the Australian Government of “phobia”, the other of a “lack of trust”. As Avery Poole explains, the signals for Australia-Indonesia relations are not good, regardless of who wins on 9 July.

Sofyan Syamsul (link is external), an East Indonesia-based photographer, followed Jokowi’s running mate Jusuf Kalla on the campaign trail in her home town of Makassar.

The latest Gerindra Party campaign advertisement has voters dancing in the streets: ‘I believe Indonesia will move forward’. You can watch it (translated) here.

As a series of debates between the Indonesian Presidential candidates kicks off, Dave McRae critiques their opening round performances – and reads between the lines.

Jokowi and Prabowo both claim to have won the election. How can this be? Diane Zhang explains why the weight of credible quick counts stands with Jokowi, and looks at what lies ahead for Indonesia.

Revisit the Election Watch/ University of Melbourne School of Government expert forum reflecting on the Indonesian and Indian elections and what they mean for Australia.

The candidates for the Indonesian presidency have presented their political visions to the voters. How do they compare?
Lily Yulianti Farid.

Image: Rocco Stecher/Fotopedia.com

A former special forces commander with noble lineage but a past with allegations of human rights abuses, Prabowo Subianto is reinventing himself as a champion of the people as he campaigns to be the next Indonesian President. By Helen Pausacker

From humble beginnings, presidential frontrunner Joko Widodo has made his “can do” reputation first in business and then in politics. Helen Pausacker explores the history that has shaped him.

As political campaigns become more slick, the price of party success skyrockets, encouraging corruption. Thomas Reuter explores how this plays out in Indonesia, and suggests some solutions.