Indonesia has been widely criticised for its decision to limit the involvement of foreign aid personnel in the response to the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Palu, Central Sulawesi. Ashlee Betteridge writes that Indonesia is doing the right thing by restricting access.

Indonesians’ lack of interest in reading is well documented – a recent study put the country in 60th position out of 61 countries in terms of interest in reading. But is anyone doing anything to address the reading crisis? Dr Lily Yulianti Farid, founder and director of the Makassar International Writers Festival, takes a look at what is being done – and what should be done – to make reading more fun.

About 18,000 Indonesians have studied in Australia on government-funded scholarships since the 1940s. What has the impact of these scholarships been, for the students themselves, for Indonesia and Australia? Dr Dave McRae explores this question with Dr Jemma Purdey, who has recently completed a study on the issue.

Pregnancy and childbirth are the number one cause of death and illness for women during humanitarian crises. Kate Walton explains what needs to be done to improve healthcare for asylum seekers in Aceh.

Tim Mann writes that much of the discussion of the recent aid cuts to Indonesia has overlooked their potential impact on one of the key elements in the consolidation of democracy in the country: civil society.