Category: Analysis

Last month, Jakarta Governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama disappointed many of his supporters when he announced that he would run as a party-backed candidate in the 2017 election. Dr Dirk Tomsa takes a look at Teman Ahok, the volunteer group that campaigned for the governor to run as an independent. What’s next for Teman Ahok, now that its reason for being no longer exists?

Divorces are becoming more common in Indonesia, and women are now responsible for 80 per cent of divorce applications. Dr Dina Afrianty writes that although Indonesian law requires husbands and fathers to pay child support and maintenance after divorce, women have few avenues for redress if their former husbands don’t pull their weight.

President Joko Widodo’s economy-focused cabinet reshuffle on 27 July has been described as evidence of his growing talent for managing political relationships. But as Matthew Busch writes, while the reshuffle might be a political success, it should not be assumed the gloss extends to the economy.

Over the past few months, Rahung Nasution’s film, Pulau Buru, Tanah Air Beta (Buru Island, My Homeland), has upset military officials, religious hard-liners and university authorities, who have all attempted to have screenings cancelled. Dr Airlangga Pribadi Kusman takes a look at the film that has caused such controversy.

President Joko Widodo appointed a new cabinet on 27 July, adding nine new faces. Burhanuddin Muhtadi writes that the reshuffle was a pragmatic move aimed at consolidating his now broad ruling coalition and providing him with greater freedom to implement his priority programs. He might appear to be playing it safe, Burhanuddin says, but this strategy is not without risks.

Last week, the judges of the International People’s Tribunal 1965 released their final report, finding the Indonesian state responsible for crimes against humanity. But what is the standing of the IPT and what impact might its findings have? Associate Professor Katharine McGregor and Dr Jemma Purdey examine the fallout from the report’s release.

Vicky Prasetyo became a national laughing stock in 2013 when he introduced a unique vocabulary of buzzwords into Bahasa Indonesia. Dr Manneke Budiman writes that his ungrammatical and meaningless expressions are representative of a style of speech that has become more common in the 18 years since Soeharto fell.

Indonesia has recently seen a surge in enthusiasm for capital punishment, with public officials lining up to declare their support. How can this be explained? Are officials just responding to public demands? Nurkholis Hidayat examines Indonesia’s embrace of the death penalty and looks at what it means for the justice sector.

Over the past few years, the idea that Indonesia will be the next rising power in Asia has grown in prominence among academics and political and business leaders. But Professor Richard Robison argues that a number of characteristics of the Indonesian state mean that these “great power” aspirations will remain unfulfilled.

Defence Minister Ryamizard Ryacudu has been out talking up his ministry’s Bela Negara program, which apparently aims to inspire a love for the homeland and protect it from “extreme ideologies”. But is Bela Negara really about strengthening nationalism, or is it just another attempt to introduce compulsory military service? Bhatara Ibnu Reza takes a look at the program.

Indonesians often complain about kelas menengah ngehe, or the “awful middle class”, on social media. But despite the ubiquity of the term, there is little consensus on how to define it. Who are the awful middle class? And what makes them so ngehe? Dr Salut Muhidin takes a look at the phenomenon.

More than a year after 1,000 Rohingya asylum seekers arrived on the shores of North Aceh, few have been resettled in western countries. The fact that many Rohingya are poor and illiterate means they are not considered a priority. Lies Marcoes found that the global indifference to their plight may be driving them to join the Islamic State.