Going by the first presidential debate on 20 January, neither candidate feels that the electorate cares much about human rights. Dr Robertus Robet and Dr Alfindra Primaldhi present survey results suggesting that Indonesians do believe human rights are important – but acceptance of rights has its limits.

With rights on the agenda during the first debate on 17 January, expectations were high. But as Dr Ken Setiawan writes, the performance of both candidate pairs left little hope for an improvement in the human rights situation.

In the wake of the attack in Nduga district, Dr Dave McRae speaks to Dr Jenny Munro about the situation in the Papuan provinces. How do Papuans feel about the government’s infrastructure push in the region, and their place in the Indonesian nation?

On 8 December, an estimated 2,000 people marched through central Jakarta to urge the House of Representatives (DPR) to urgently pass the anti-sexual violence bill. Here we present a selection of images from the demonstration, taken by women’s activist Tunggal Pawestri.

Indonesian Solidarity Party (PSI) head Grace Natalie has been accused of blasphemy for remarks she made on shari’a-inspired local regulations. Is there now no room for non-Muslims to comment on religion in public? Daniel Peterson examines the case against her.

Indonesia is still basking in the success of the 2018 Asian Games and Asian Para Games. Slamet Thohari writes that while Indonesia deserves the plaudits it received, the Games also served to highlight outdated attitudes to people with disability.

Some 23 people have been sentenced under the Blasphemy Law since President Joko Widodo came to power in 2014, including six this year. Andreas Harsono from Human Rights Watch looks at the impact of the law on its victims, such as ethnic Chinese Buddhist Meliana.

Although opportunities for education remain limited for people with disability in Indonesia, some Islamic universities have taken steps to improve accessibility. In Talking Indonesia, Dr Dirk Tomsa chats to Dr Dina Afrianty about what pushed them to act, and the likelihood that others will follow.

What does the 1965 violence have to do with Ratna Sarumpaet? Hellena Souisa examines two incidents that demonstrate how serious the problem of hoaxes has become for Indonesian politics.

Community-based paralegals play an important role in providing legal services for poor Indonesians. But Antoni Putra writes that a recent Supreme Court decision on paralegals could see their role curtailed, further restricting access to justice for already underrepresented communities.

President Joko Widodo surprised many when he selected Islamic cleric Ma’ruf Amin as his vice presidential running mate. Dr Budhy Munawar Rachman looks at Ma’ruf’s record at the Indonesian Council of Ulama (MUI) and writes that if the pair are elected, things could become a lot worse for religious minorities.

How will the newly passed Law on the Protection of Indonesian Migrant Workers improve conditions for the millions of Indonesian citizens working overseas? What more needs to be done? Dr Jemma Purdey chats to Migrant CARE Director Anis Hidayah in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.