Category: Human Rights

Fifty years after the beginning of the 1965 violence, many children and grandchildren of those targeted also continue to feel its impact. Dr Kate McGregor examines two cultural memory projects that involve collaboration across generations and aim to crack the resilience of anti-communist versions of history.

Wednesday will mark 50 years since the events that triggered the brutal repression of the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI) and its alleged sympathisers. Ken Setiawan writes that while political elites appear to be able to stomach the idea of reconciliation, an apology is far more contested.

A gay web series last week provoked the ire of at least one lawmaker, who called for it to be blocked and its makers dealt with in the courts. As Hendri Yulius writes, the episode was just another example of the government’s double standard in its approach to issues of sexuality.

The Jakarta government last week forcibly removed residents from Kampung Pulo, on the banks of the Ciliwung River, after they rejected offers of replacement housing. As Dr Ken Setiawan writes, despite having the support of the middle class, the evictions demonstrated a blatant disregard for the rights of the residents.

In town for the Melbourne International Film Festival, director Joshua Oppenheimer spoke to Indonesia at Melbourne about The Look of Silence, his remarkable follow-up to The Act of Killing.

Joshua Oppenheimer’s breathtaking 2012 documentary, The Act of Killing, focused the world’s attention on the 1965 Indonesian genocide. As Dr Jess Melvin writes, his equally stunning 2014 companion piece, The Look of Silence, demands we do not look away.

Pregnancy and childbirth are the number one cause of death and illness for women during humanitarian crises. Kate Walton explains what needs to be done to improve healthcare for asylum seekers in Aceh.

In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae speaks to the University of Melbourne’s Dr Ken Setiawan about her recent trip to Buru Island, where her father was held as a political prisoner from 1971 to 1978.

After granting clemency to five Papuans in May, Jokowi’s efforts to release more political prisoners have met with little success. Assistant Professor Daniel Pascoe explains the difference between amnesty and clemency, and how neither option looks like it will allow Jokowi to deliver on his promise. Photo by Øystein Solvang/NHD

The Melanesian Spearhead Group’s decision to grant observer status to the United Liberation Movement for West Papua (ULMPB) means that for the first time, West Papuans and Indonesians will be sitting at the same table in an international forum. Dr Richard Chauvel looks at the impact of the move in the final post of his three part series on Papua. Photo by Stefan Armbruster/SBS World News.

The US Supreme Court’s ruling on marriage equality has provoked strong reactions in Indonesia. As Hendri Yulius writes, the response to one pop star’s support for the decision helps to explain what it means to be Indonesian.

Pat Walsh AM spent 12 months travelling across Indonesia to examine the impact of the Chega! and Per Memoriam truth commission reports on Indonesian understandings of East Timor. Indonesia at Melbourne spoke to Pat about the project and prospects for meaningful reconciliation. Photo by Pat Walsh.