Category: Political parties

Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir and Rafiqa Qurrata A’yun take a look at the results of the 2018 regional elections. Rather than reflecting national-level dynamics, they write, the behaviour of political parties and politicians at the local level is defined primarily by opportunism.

Last month, Prosperous Justice Party (PKS) leaders criticised a senior Nahdlatul Ulama (NU) figure for visiting Israel, sparking a furious online campaign of retaliation from young NU-linked activists. Associate Professor Greg Fealy takes a closer look at the escalating tensions and what they might mean for next year’s elections.

The government recently announced that from 2018, state funding for political parties will increase 10 fold, from Rp 108 to Rp 1,000 per valid vote per year. Rezza Velayati Deviansyah writes that although there are reasons to be cautious, the government has made the right move.

Last month, Jakarta Governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama disappointed many of his supporters when he announced that he would run as a party-backed candidate in the 2017 election. Dr Dirk Tomsa takes a look at Teman Ahok, the volunteer group that campaigned for the governor to run as an independent. What’s next for Teman Ahok, now that its reason for being no longer exists?

Luqman-nul Hakim recently argued that the dismissal of Fahri Hamzah from the Prosperous Justice Party (PKS) indicated that the party was returning to its ideological roots. But Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir and Andi Rahman Alamsyah contend that the party’s recent political manoeuvres suggest it will continue to favour a pragmatic approach. It will need to because of its weak position in politics.

Previous attempts by the Indonesian left to move into politics have not met with much success. Iqra Anugrah looks at the Confederation of Indonesian People’s Movements (KPRI), an emerging alliance that is now making preparations to participate in elections in 2017 and 2019. Will it be able to make an impact where others have struggled?

The Minangkabau of West Sumatra are considered the world’s largest matrilineal society. But despite the apparent high status of women in the province, there is just one woman among the 74 candidates for leadership positions in regional elections scheduled for 9 December. Minangkabau woman Dina Afrianty reports from West Sumatra.

Is generational change taking place within Indonesia’s political parties? Dr Dave McRae explores this issue and more with Philips Vermonte, from the Centre for Strategic and International Studies in Jakarta, in the first episode of the new Talking Indonesia podcast.