Category: Review

“Istirahatlah Kata-Kata”, or “Solo, Solitude”, is a moving depiction of the life of dissident poet and activist Widji Thukul during a period of self-imposed exile under the New Order. Elly Kent presents a lovely review of the film, which has been immensely popular since its release on 19 January.

In our final post for 2016, we send off this rather depressing year by taking a look back at some of the expert commentary and analysis published on Indonesia at Melbourne. Thanks again for your loyal readership and support, and we look forward to seeing you again in mid-January.

Over the past few months, Rahung Nasution’s film, Pulau Buru, Tanah Air Beta (Buru Island, My Homeland), has upset military officials, religious hard-liners and university authorities, who have all attempted to have screenings cancelled. Dr Airlangga Pribadi Kusman takes a look at the film that has caused such controversy.

Last week marked one year since we launched Indonesia at Melbourne on 1 July 2015. Today we present a brief look back at our first year, highlighting the 10 most viewed blog posts and five most popular podcasts. We hope you have enjoyed the blog as much as we have enjoyed producing it.

Writer and director Djenar Maesa Ayu has established a reputation for her unflinching approach to the problems faced by women in modern Indonesian society. Dr Gaston Soehadi reviews her new film, Nay, which is screening in Melbourne as part of the 2016 Indonesian Film Festival.

Indonesia at Melbourne is taking a break until 12 January. In this final post for 2015, we look back at the first six months of the blog, and revisit some of the posts that captured our readers’ attention. Thanks for your support, and we look forward to seeing you again in the New Year!

Joshua Oppenheimer’s breathtaking 2012 documentary, The Act of Killing, focused the world’s attention on the 1965 Indonesian genocide. As Dr Jess Melvin writes, his equally stunning 2014 companion piece, The Look of Silence, demands we do not look away.