Indonesian Solidarity Party (PSI) head Grace Natalie has been accused of blasphemy for remarks she made on shari’a-inspired local regulations. Is there now no room for non-Muslims to comment on religion in public? Daniel Peterson examines the case against her.

In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Charlotte Setijadi chats to Dr Quinton Temby about what the youth-focused revivalist movement Pemuda Hijrah and other groups like it can tell us about the type of Islam that appeals to young Indonesian Muslims.

The brutal death of Persija supporter Haringga Sirla at the hands of rival Persib supporters in September attracted national and international attention. But two months on, has anything been done to prevent further violence? Dr Andy Fuller looks at the problems plaguing Indonesian domestic football.

How much do parents’ education levels affect the schooling of their children? Senza Arsendy presents the results of a recent study showing that despite concerns over the impact of growing economic inequality, educational mobility increased from 1997 to 2015.

President Soeharto left office in 1998 amid public fury about the special treatment given to his six children. Dr Helen Pausacker writes that in the 20 years since, Soeharto’s children have seen their influence decline, but continue to live prosperous lives and have made several attempts to launch political careers of their own.

What have been the key achievements of the reform movement that toppled Soeharto, what are the key obstacles to further reform, and what lies ahead for Indonesia over the next 10 years? Senior human rights activist Usman Hamid reflects on 20 years of reform with Dr Dave McRae in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

This month marks 20 years since the riots and violence that erupted in cities including Jakarta, Medan and Solo, and mainly targeted Indonesia’s ethnic Chinese population. In light of the recent surge in anti-Chinese sentiment in Indonesia, Dr Jemma Purdey questions whether violence like that of May 1998 could happen again.

21 May marks 20 years since Soeharto stepped down, ending 32 years of authoritarian rule under the New Order, and setting off a major process of democratic reform. Indonesia at Melbourne is publishing a range of commentary and interviews reflecting on the reform process and what lies ahead for Indonesia.

The Chinese state’s Confucius Institutes are often depicted as vehicles for expanding Chinese soft power. But as Rika Theo writes, the Indonesian experience demonstrates that the institutes are not simply unidirectional projects imposed on Indonesia from a wealthy partner seeking to expand its influence.

On 3 March, hundreds of Indonesian feminists took to the streets in the second Jakarta Women’s March, demanding that the government promote gender equality in law making and public policy and take action to eradicate violence against women. Like similar marches across the globe, the event featured many powerful and humorous signs.

More than half of Indonesia’s population is under the age of 30 but little research has been done into the attitudes of the country’s youth. Do they care about social inequality and environmental degradation? How do their consumption patterns reflect their values and aspirations? Dr Charlotte Setijadi discusses these issues and more with Dr Meghan Downes in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Indonesia at Melbourne will again be taking a short break over Christmas and New Year. In this final post for 2017, we look back at the analysis and commentary featured on the blog and podcast throughout the year. Thanks again for your loyal readership and support, and we look forward to seeing you again mid-January.