Category: Society

Despite the many problems of its domestic leagues, Indonesia has a strong and passionate football fan culture. Who exactly supports football and in what ways? What can be done to improve the game, for supporters and players? Dr Ken Setiawan discusses these issues and more with Dr Andy Fuller in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

Nearly 2 million Australians watched Indonesian-born sisters Tasia and Gracia Seger take out the final of My Kitchen Rules on 26 April. Indonesia at Melbourne spoke to the girls about their approach to cooking and their views on the Australia-Indonesia relationship.

Why do Indonesians migrate? And how do women – the majority of Indonesian migrants – maintain links with their home country? Dr Ken Setiawan speaks to Dr Monika Winarnita about these issues and more in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Indonesia has seen a sustained attack on the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community over the past two months, triggered by comments made by the minister of higher education, research and technology, Muhammad Nasir. Indonesia at Melbourne spoke to the godfather of gay activism in Indonesia, Dede Oetomo, about the moral panic gripping the nation.

Jakarta bid farewell to the Kalijodo red-light district last week. The city administration had announced plans to raze the area and turn it into green space just 20 days before the bulldozers moved in. Freelance photographer Imang Jasmine was there to capture the notorious district’s final moments.

Most Indonesian streets appear tired and unloved. But they are also the only truly public spaces in Indonesian cities. Dr Amanda Achmadi profiles Visual Jalanan, an initiative that aims to document the provocative, profound and often silly visual works and activities found on streets across the country.

Indonesian reporting on the arrest of so-called celebrity prostitute Nikita Mirzani has been detailed and profuse. Hendri Yulius writes that, whether we like to admit it or not, we all gain a degree of pleasure from reading these highly sexualised reports.

Dr Edwin Jurriens profiles the independent Bandung artist Tisna Sanjaya, one of 15 contemporary Indonesian artists presenting work at the Shout! exhibition, part of Multicultural Arts Victoria’s Mapping Melbourne festival.

More than a decade has passed since Indonesia passed legislation on elimination of violence against women in the home. But as Dina Afrianty writes, most women still prefer to escape abusive marriages through divorce, rather than pursue charges against their husbands.

Indonesia has been swept up in a gemstone craze. Enthusiast Houtmand Saragih explains the origins of the trend and why he is such a fan.