It’s time again for Indonesia at Melbourne to take a short break over the Christmas and New Year period. Here we reflect on some of our favourite and most popular blog posts and podcasts from 2018. We look forward to seeing you again when we return in mid-January.

The number of local politicians arrested for bribery by the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) over the past two years has been astonishing. Adnan Topan Husodo writes that the KPK deserves credit for its efforts but a stronger focus on bigger players in Jakarta is needed.

To mark 20 years since the fall of Soeharto and the New Order regime, Indonesia at Melbourne is speaking to a range of prominent figures about their views on the reform process. Today we speak to Todung Mulya Lubis, human rights lawyer and recently appointed Indonesian Ambassador to Norway.

President Soeharto left office in 1998 amid public fury about the special treatment given to his six children. Dr Helen Pausacker writes that in the 20 years since, Soeharto’s children have seen their influence decline, but continue to live prosperous lives and have made several attempts to launch political careers of their own.

During Soeharto’s 32 years in power, a small number of privileged business tycoons were able to accumulate extraordinary amounts of wealth. Professor Howard Dick and Jeremy Mulholland look at what has happened to Soeharto’s cronies and the relationship between power and capital since the fall of the New Order.

Indonesia has achieved remarkable change since Soeharto stepped down. But Professor Tim Lindsey writes that where the country will head next is far from certain, and recent developments suggest its future may be less liberal and less welcoming of foreign engagement.

Although remarkable progress has been achieved in judicial reform since the end of the New Order in 1998, the justice sector still faces serious challenges, such as widespread judicial corruption. Rifqi Assegaf reflects on what has been achieved, and what has not, over the past 20 years.

While most of Indonesian civil society was preoccupied with proposed changes to the Criminal Code, the House of Representatives (DPR) last week passed a revised version of the 2014 Law on Legislative Bodies. Dr Robertus Robet looks at the controversial changes, which he says will result in a DPR that is resistant to criticism and immune from prosecution.

On 8 February, the Constitutional Court issued a decision that paves the way for the national legislature (DPR) to compel the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) to attend questioning, using its so-called hak angket powers. Professor Simon Butt presents a legal analysis of the decision.

The government recently announced that from 2018, state funding for political parties will increase 10 fold, from Rp 108 to Rp 1,000 per valid vote per year. Rezza Velayati Deviansyah writes that although there are reasons to be cautious, the government has made the right move.

Demonstrations on International Labour Day have recently featured somewhat surprising calls for the dissolution of the Industrial Relations Court. Dr Herlambang P Wiratraman looks at why the court – originally intended to provide greater protection for workers’ rights – has failed to live up to its promise.

Ignoring protests from the public, and some of its own members, the House of Representatives (DPR) recently launched a special inquiry into the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK). Rifqi Assegaf explains the significance and likely impact of the contentious inquiry.