President Soeharto left office in 1998 amid public fury about the special treatment given to his six children. Dr Helen Pausacker writes that in the 20 years since, Soeharto’s children have seen their influence decline, but continue to live prosperous lives and have made several attempts to launch political careers of their own.

Indonesia has achieved remarkable change since Soeharto stepped down. But Professor Tim Lindsey writes that where the country will head next is far from certain, and recent developments suggest its future may be less liberal and less welcoming of foreign engagement.

Although remarkable progress has been achieved in judicial reform since the end of the New Order in 1998, the justice sector still faces serious challenges, such as widespread judicial corruption. Rifqi Assegaf reflects on what has been achieved, and what has not, over the past 20 years.

While most of Indonesian civil society was preoccupied with proposed changes to the Criminal Code, the House of Representatives (DPR) last week passed a revised version of the 2014 Law on Legislative Bodies. Dr Robertus Robet looks at the controversial changes, which he says will result in a DPR that is resistant to criticism and immune from prosecution.

On 8 February, the Constitutional Court issued a decision that paves the way for the national legislature (DPR) to compel the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) to attend questioning, using its so-called hak angket powers. Professor Simon Butt presents a legal analysis of the decision.

The government recently announced that from 2018, state funding for political parties will increase 10 fold, from Rp 108 to Rp 1,000 per valid vote per year. Rezza Velayati Deviansyah writes that although there are reasons to be cautious, the government has made the right move.

Demonstrations on International Labour Day have recently featured somewhat surprising calls for the dissolution of the Industrial Relations Court. Dr Herlambang P Wiratraman looks at why the court – originally intended to provide greater protection for workers’ rights – has failed to live up to its promise.

Ignoring protests from the public, and some of its own members, the House of Representatives (DPR) recently launched a special inquiry into the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK). Rifqi Assegaf explains the significance and likely impact of the contentious inquiry.

What triggered the House of Representatives (DPR) inquiry into the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK)? What are the implications for the KPK and its role in the fight against corruption? Dr Jemma Purdey explores these questions and more with Dr Deasy Simandjuntak in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Legal observers have welcomed President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s decision to select Saldi Isra to replace corruption suspect Patrialis Akbar on the Constitutional Court. Muhammad Tanziel Aziezi writes that the transparent and participatory selection process was crucial for improving public faith in the institution.

The extractive industries sector is notorious for rent-seeking, opaque licensing rules and assertive resource nationalism. In this episode of Talking Indonesia, new host Dr Dirk Tomas speaks to Dr Poppy Sulistyaning Winanti about civil society efforts to improve transparency and accountability in the sector.

Last week, Indonesia at Melbourne spoke to former Constitutional Court Chief Justice Mahfud MD during a visit to Melbourne Law School. In this Q&A, Mahfud reflects on a number of the controversial cases that came before the court during his tenure, as well as prospects for anti-corruption and bureaucratic reform under President Joko Widodo.