To mark 20 years since the fall of Soeharto and the New Order regime, Indonesia at Melbourne is speaking to a range of prominent figures about their views on the reform process. Today we speak to Professor Jimly Assiddiqie, the former head of the Constitutional Court.

What have been the key achievements of the reform movement that toppled Soeharto, what are the key obstacles to further reform, and what lies ahead for Indonesia over the next 10 years? Senior human rights activist Usman Hamid reflects on 20 years of reform with Dr Dave McRae in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

To mark 20 years since the fall of Soeharto and the New Order regime, Indonesia at Melbourne is speaking to a range of prominent figures about their views on the reform process. Today we speak to John McCarthy AO, Australian ambassador to Indonesia from 1997-2000.

Indonesia has achieved remarkable change since Soeharto stepped down. But Professor Tim Lindsey writes that where the country will head next is far from certain, and recent developments suggest its future may be less liberal and less welcoming of foreign engagement.

21 May marks 20 years since Soeharto stepped down, ending 32 years of authoritarian rule under the New Order, and setting off a major process of democratic reform. Indonesia at Melbourne is publishing a range of commentary and interviews reflecting on the reform process and what lies ahead for Indonesia.

The government recently announced that from 2018, state funding for political parties will increase 10 fold, from Rp 108 to Rp 1,000 per valid vote per year. Rezza Velayati Deviansyah writes that although there are reasons to be cautious, the government has made the right move.

Is Indonesia seeing the emergence of a ‘Neo-New Order’? Is democracy really in peril? Following his interview on Talking Indonesia last week, Professor Todung Mulya Lubis writes that although many aspects of Indonesian democracy are functioning well, there is serious cause for concern.

What does the recent attack on the Legal Aid Foundation (LBH) mean for human rights and civil society in Indonesia? What are the challenges facing the government as it heads toward the 2019 election? Is Indonesia’s democracy in peril? Dr Jemma Purdey explores these questions and more with pre-eminent human rights lawyer Professor Todung Mulya Lubis.

On 16 November, police declared Jakarta Governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, or Ahok, a suspect for blasphemy over a speech he made in which he quoted a verse from the Qur’an. Why have Ahok’s comments provoked such an intense reaction in Indonesia, and what can we learn from this case about the position of non-Muslims and ethnic Chinese Indonesians in Indonesian democracy? Dr Dave McRae speaks to Dr Nadirsyah Hosen about the case.

During the New Order period, the middle class was routinely depicted as small (less than 10 per cent of the population) and uninterested in democracy. According to Dr Gerry van Klinken, that picture now needs a serious overhaul. They are interested in democracy, he writes, and even more in decentralisation, and play a crucial role in holding the country together.

Presidential hopeful Prabowo Subianto has raised eyebrows by declaring direct elections a Western import, writes Dave McRae

Jokowi’s early lead has vanished, and now this polarising presidential election is too close to call, says Dave McRae.