Both pairs of presidential candidates are targeting women voters, and seeking to capitalise on “the power of emak-emak“. Dr Dina Afrianty writes that while historically many women saw the term emak as empowering, its recent use by politicians is far less complimentary.

To mark 20 years since the fall of Soeharto and the New Order regime, Indonesia at Melbourne is speaking to a range of prominent Indonesians about their views on the reform process. Today we speak to Muslim feminist Lies Marcoes.

How has digital media created spaces for a diversity of views on issues important to Indonesian women, including sexuality and religion? What does an Indonesian ‘feminist’ publication look like? In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Jemma Purdey explores these issues and more with Devi Asmarani, chief editor of online magazine Magdalene.

Many observers have suggested that the win of Anies Baswedan in the Jakarta gubernatorial election last week has set the stage for the ongoing exploitation of religious and ethnic sentiment in Indonesian politics. According to Dr Dina Afrianty, however, most post-election analyses have failed to consider what the election result means for Indonesian women.