One person was killed and 16 others injured when police opened fire on a group of Papuan protesters last month. Hipolitus Yolisandry Ringgi Wangge writes that the shooting highlights the Joko Widodo government’s misguided and poorly coordinated approach to issues in Papua.

Indonesia had its human rights record scrutinised under the United Nation’s Universal Periodic Review process for the third time last week. Dr Ken Setiawan takes a look at the concerns raised and examines the prospects for meaningful change in promotion and protection of human rights on the ground.

The recent visits of President Joko Widodo to Australia and Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull to Indonesia came in the wake of another tense period in the bilateral relationship, caused mainly by concerns over Papua. Why does this issue remain so sensitive and what is its history in the relationship? Dr Jemma Purdey explores these issues and more with Dr Richard Chauvel in Talking Indonesia.

Dr Budi Hernawan has analysed 431 cases of torture that occurred in Papua between 1963 and 2010. He writes that although torture is generally considered a hidden crime, in Papua it is performed for an audience, sometimes spectacularly, and is designed to convey a message of terror from state authorities to the Papuan public. It is part of a larger strategy of domination by the Indonesian state, he says, in which the practice of torture is sanctioned and part of policy.

An Indonesian representative to the UN won praise last month for laying into Pacific countries that questioned Indonesia’s human rights record in Papua. Hipolitus Yolisandry Ringgi Wangge writes that defensive statements about sovereignty do nothing to address the humanitarian issues that are, in fact, the primary concerns of state and non-state actors in the Pacific.

Papuan independence leader Filep Karma was released from prison last Thursday, after serving more than 10 years behind bars for treason. Does his release indicate a commitment by the government to resolve the conflict in the province, and how will it affect efforts to promote dialogue? Dr Richard Chauvel reports.

President Joko Widodo came to power one year ago with promises to combat impunity for past human rights violations, safeguard freedom of religion and improve welfare in Papua. Has the president met any of these pledges? Former LBH Jakarta director Nurkholis Hidayat takes a look at Jokowi’s human rights record.

After granting clemency to five Papuans in May, Jokowi’s efforts to release more political prisoners have met with little success. Assistant Professor Daniel Pascoe explains the difference between amnesty and clemency, and how neither option looks like it will allow Jokowi to deliver on his promise. Photo by Øystein Solvang/NHD

The Melanesian Spearhead Group’s decision to grant observer status to the United Liberation Movement for West Papua (ULMPB) means that for the first time, West Papuans and Indonesians will be sitting at the same table in an international forum. Dr Richard Chauvel looks at the impact of the move in the final post of his three part series on Papua. Photo by Stefan Armbruster/SBS World News.

Papuan support for dialogue remains strong and widespread, writes Dr Richard Chauvel in this second part of a three-part series on recent developments in Papua. Photo by Jaringan Damai Papua.

Despite President Joko Widodo’s recent announcements, Jakarta continues to believe that improved welfare will make calls for independence disappear, writes Dr Richard Chauvel. Photo by Benny Wenda.