Going by the first presidential debate on 20 January, neither candidate feels that the electorate cares much about human rights. Dr Robertus Robet and Dr Alfindra Primaldhi present survey results suggesting that Indonesians do believe human rights are important – but acceptance of rights has its limits.

Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir and Rafiqa Qurrata Ayun write that rather than dismissing non-voters as apathetic or irresponsible, it is far more productive to reflect on how they can contribute to strengthening democracy.

With rights on the agenda during the first debate on 17 January, expectations were high. But as Dr Ken Setiawan writes, the performance of both candidate pairs left little hope for an improvement in the human rights situation.

President Joko Widodo and running mate Ma’ruf Amin squared off against Prabowo Subianto and Sandiaga Uno in the first of five planned presidential debates on 17 January. Dr Dave McRae was watching, and presents his five key takeaways here.

What role do political dynasties play in Indonesian politics? What motivates political families to attempt to establish themselves as dynasties, and how do they do so? Dr Dave McRae discusses these issues and more with Dr Jemma Purdey, in the first Talking Indonesia podcast for 2017.

President Joko Widodo has already shown signs that human rights will not be a top priority for his government. But as Christian Donny Putranto writes, few of Jokowi’s passionate campaigners would have ever imagined that two years after his election his administration would promote military officials involved in abducting pro-democracy activists to senior positions in security agencies.

More than a year has now passed since Prabowo Subianto lost the 2014 Presidential Election to Joko Widodo. Dr Jemma Purdey looks at what the leader of Gerindra and his Red and White Coalition have been up to since.