The conviction of Meiliana, after she complained about the noise of a nearby mosque, has shocked Indonesia. PUSAD Paramadina researchers examine Meiliana’s complaint in detail, and the violence that followed, showing how hate was mobilised to convict her.

While Indonesia has seen a decline in state violence since the collapse of the New Order, non-state violence, particularly toward minorities, appears to have increased. This has contributed to restriction of civil liberties, and poses challenges for democratic reform. In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Ken Setiawan chats to Dr Budi Hernawan about the shrinking space for civil liberties.

Following the recent attack on the Gafatar community, and efforts to evict Ahmadiyah followers from Bangka Island, religious intolerance is once again in the spotlight. What are the drivers of intolerance, and what forms does it take? Is President Joko Widodo doing any better than his predecessor at managing the issue? Dr Dave McRae explores these questions with Ihsan Ali-Fauzi in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Al Makin writes that as long as Indonesians remain a pious people oriented toward religion, new religious movements like Gafatar will continue to emerge. Both the government and Indonesian citizens need to accept this fact. Photo by Jessica Helena Wuysang for Antara.

What makes West Java so prone to religious intolerance and violence? And which regulations, if any, need to be reformed to reduce conflict? Indonesia at Melbourne explored these issues with Dr Melissa Crouch, whose book examines religious conflict and the use of the courts by intolerant groups in West Java.