It’s time again for Indonesia at Melbourne to take a short break over the Christmas and New Year period. Here we reflect on some of our favourite and most popular blog posts and podcasts from 2018. We look forward to seeing you again when we return in mid-January.

In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Charlotte Setijadi chats to Dr Quinton Temby about what the youth-focused revivalist movement Pemuda Hijrah and other groups like it can tell us about the type of Islam that appeals to young Indonesian Muslims.

More than ever, Indonesia’s young people are playing a key role in the country’s politics. In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Jemma Purdey speaks to Indonesia Solidarity Party candidate Rian Ernest about his political beliefs and what motivated him to get into politics.

More than half of Indonesia’s population is under the age of 30 but little research has been done into the attitudes of the country’s youth. Do they care about social inequality and environmental degradation? How do their consumption patterns reflect their values and aspirations? Dr Charlotte Setijadi discusses these issues and more with Dr Meghan Downes in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

The recent death of a 27-year-old from laryngeal cancer has highlighted the problem of youth smoking in Indonesia. As Ayu Swandewi writes, the government has much work to do to address the aggressive targeting of young people by tobacco companies.

This bilingual spoof of the recent presidential debates gives a glimpse of the attitudes of the young generation of voters who got Jokowi over the line.

Del Irani from the ABC Australia Network program #talkaboutit (link is external) spent time at the University of Melbourne in mid-April talking with students about their views on the Indonesian elections.