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Last weekend, the minister of higher education, research and technology stated that he would ban LGBT Indonesians from all universities in the country. Although he has attempted to qualify this statement, Hendri Yulius describes how the incident is part of a trend of increasing restrictions on the discussion of LGBT issues in Indonesian universities.

After a difficult year for the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK), what are the prospects for corruption eradication in 2016? The coordinator of Indonesia Corruption Watch, Adnan Topan Husodo, writes that although it still has a lot of homework to do, the public should not give up on the KPK just yet.

National health laws and health promotion discourse in Indonesia are heavily geared toward the promotion of exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of a baby’s life. But as Belinda Raintung explains, maternity leave provisions have not kept pace, placing significant burdens on mothers.

Police have named Bahrun Naim, an Indonesian affiliated with ISIS, as the suspected mastermind of the Jakarta attacks. Who is he, and does this mean Indonesia should expect further attacks from ISIS-affiliated in groups in the country? In this special edition of Talking Indonesia, Dr Dave McRae explores these issues with Solahudin, a leading expert on jihadism in Indonesia.

British naturalist Alfred Wallace was a leading evolutionary scholar known for describing the Wallace Line, which separates the distinct flora and fauna of eastern and western Indonesia. In Talking Indonesia, Dr Dave McRae speaks to Dr Jeff Neilson, who is exploring the relevance of “a Wallacean worldview” for the study of sustainable livelihoods.

Most Indonesian streets appear tired and unloved. But they are also the only truly public spaces in Indonesian cities. Dr Amanda Achmadi profiles Visual Jalanan, an initiative that aims to document the provocative, profound and often silly visual works and activities found on streets across the country.

Indonesia at Melbourne is taking a break until 12 January. In this final post for 2015, we look back at the first six months of the blog, and revisit some of the posts that captured our readers’ attention. Thanks for your support, and we look forward to seeing you again in the New Year!

Last month, the International People’s Tribunal on 1965 crimes against humanity provoked a predictably strong response in Indonesia. Associate Professor Katharine McGregor and Dr Jemma Purdey reflect on the tribunal and its consequences for the activists who participated.

Indonesian reporting on the arrest of so-called celebrity prostitute Nikita Mirzani has been detailed and profuse. Hendri Yulius writes that, whether we like to admit it or not, we all gain a degree of pleasure from reading these highly sexualised reports.

Dr Edwin Jurriens profiles the independent Bandung artist Tisna Sanjaya, one of 15 contemporary Indonesian artists presenting work at the Shout! exhibition, part of Multicultural Arts Victoria’s Mapping Melbourne festival.

What accounts for the sympathetic and supportive Indonesian response Rohingya asylum seekers received on their arrival in Aceh in May, and how have they fared since? Dr Dave McRae explores these issues and more with Dr Antje Missbach in the final Talking Indonesia podcast for 2015.

Indonesian voters will head to the ballot box on Wednesday to elect governors and mayors in nine provinces and 260 districts. Dr Dave McRae and Diane Zhang take a close look at past election results to examine the extent to which incumbency provides candidates with an edge.

Indonesian oil and gas exploration has been described as “in crisis”, with analysts pinning the blame on excessive and contradictory regulations and an inefficient bureaucracy. Senior ABC journalist Helen Brown spoke to Andang Bachtiar about his efforts to improve data access in the sector in this piece for Indonesia at Melbourne.

What makes West Java so prone to religious intolerance and violence? And which regulations, if any, need to be reformed to reduce conflict? Indonesia at Melbourne explored these issues with Dr Melissa Crouch, whose book examines religious conflict and the use of the courts by intolerant groups in West Java.

Infertility is a major problem in Indonesia and this is reflected in the rapidly growing numbers of Indonesians presenting to infertility clinics. But as Dr Linda Rae Bennett writes, doctors’ assumptions about sexual morality are having a significant impact on the quality of care women experience.

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