Category: Education

Prominent public intellectual and leading critic of the Soeharto regime Arief Budiman died on 23 April. Professor Vedi Hadiz reflects on the life of the dissident academic and Foundation Professor of Indonesian Studies at the University of Melbourne.

Indonesian girls are now outperforming boys in both literacy and numeracy in the early grades. But as Senza Arsendy and George Sukoco write, the picture is more complicated at the high school level.

A laughable claim about the danger of falling pregnant in swimming pools raises serious concerns about the state of adolescent sexual and reproductive health in Indonesia, writes SurveyMETER’s Dwi Oktarina

High university drop-out rates for deaf students point to the need for education in their mother tongue, writes Alies Poetri Lintangsari.

Bahasa Indonesia is the mother tongue of less than 10 per cent of the Indonesian population. Senza Arsendy makes the case for greater use of local languages in the education of young students.

The government has recently implemented a new school zoning policy in an attempt to reduce educational inequality. It’s a good start, writes Senza Arsendy, but more work is needed to ensure all students have access to quality education.

How much do parents’ education levels affect the schooling of their children? Senza Arsendy presents the results of a recent study showing that despite concerns over the impact of growing economic inequality, educational mobility increased from 1997 to 2015.

Although opportunities for education remain limited for people with disability in Indonesia, some Islamic universities have taken steps to improve accessibility. In Talking Indonesia, Dr Dirk Tomsa chats to Dr Dina Afrianty about what pushed them to act, and the likelihood that others will follow.

Indonesians were stunned over the weekend by photos of kindergarten students dressed as violent extremists. Lies Marcoes writes that while the choice of costume was disturbing, the fact that something like this could happen in an Indonesian kindergarten was not a surprise.

The Chinese state’s Confucius Institutes are often depicted as vehicles for expanding Chinese soft power. But as Rika Theo writes, the Indonesian experience demonstrates that the institutes are not simply unidirectional projects imposed on Indonesia from a wealthy partner seeking to expand its influence.

Indonesian universities now have far greater institutional autonomy than they did under the New Order regime. But Diatyka Widya Permata Yasih and Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir write that real autonomy involves the freedom to take a critical stance against the interests of the state and market. And this is where Indonesian universities are struggling.

Why do Indonesian universities perform so poorly in global university rankings? What reforms have been attempted and why have they failed? Dr Dirk Tomsa explores these issues and more with Professor Andrew Rosser in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.