Category: Law

As protests rage, legal avenues to overturn the controversial law may no longer be the answer, write Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir and Rafiqa Qurrata A’yun.

The omnibus Law on Job Creation has been widely criticised for its problematic provisions on labour, indigenous peoples’ rights and the environment, but Rizky Argama writes that the process by which the bill became law was also deeply flawed procedurally.

The government has said it wants to set up a truth and reconciliation commission to resolve past rights violations. Aisah Putri Budiatri and Feri Kusuma look at whether it will actually happen.

Professor Simon Butt examines the hasty revisions made to the Law on the Constitutional Court, writing that the amendments have given too much independence to judges at the Court.

The effort of RCTI and iNews to challenge the Broadcasting Law should be seen for what it is, writes Wahyudi Akmaliah, a panicked move by oligarchic media that have not been able to adapt to a changing media environment.

If scholarships are designed to strengthen the next generation of thinkers in Indonesia, writes Herlambang P Wiratraman, judging recipients on their “loyalty” to whoever controls government is entirely counterproductive.

Economic downturn due to the pandemic is exacerbating drivers of child marriage, risking gender equality and children’s rights, writes Laras Susanti.

Dr Dina Afrianty, Slamet Thohari, Tommy Firmanda and Mahalli write that the Covid-19 pandemic may force teachers to get up to speed with technology that can improve access to education for students with disabilities.

Nadirsyah Hosen and Jeremy J Kingsley look at the debate over the Pancasila guidelines bill and argue that one of Pancasila’s main strengths is its ambiguity.

Abdurrachman Satrio writes that the debate on the Pancasila bill is missing the point. The real concern is that Pancasila can be easily abused for anti-democratic purposes.

The free trade agreement between Australia and Indonesia comes into force today. Kate Thresher examines the agreement, and concerns that investors’ interests could come into conflict with interpretations of ‘public morals’ in Indonesia.

Dr Nadirsyah Hosen, Dr Jeremy J Kingsley and Professor Tim Lindsey write that the so-called “omnibus bill” on job creation has been misnamed – it is basically about making life easier for big business.