No need to wait for the fourth industrial revolution, dehumanisation is already a reality for informal domestic workers in Indonesia, writes M. Nur Sholikin.

The arrest of academic Robertus Robet on Thursday for allegedly insulting the Indonesian Military (TNI) has shocked Indonesia. Leopold Sudaryono examines the many legal problems involved with the case against Robet.

The Constitutional Court recently ruled that the current marriageable age of 16 for girls was unconstitutional. Dr Dina Afrianty examines the landmark decision – a remarkably different outcome to the last time the Court heard the issue.

The new Smart Pakem app is supposed to give the public a safe way to report “deviant” religious practices. But could it trigger persecution and conflict instead? Zainal Abidin Bagir weighs up the implications for religion and rights.

On 8 December, an estimated 2,000 people marched through central Jakarta to urge the House of Representatives (DPR) to urgently pass the anti-sexual violence bill. Here we present a selection of images from the demonstration, taken by women’s activist Tunggal Pawestri.

Some 23 people have been sentenced under the Blasphemy Law since President Joko Widodo came to power in 2014, including six this year. Andreas Harsono from Human Rights Watch looks at the impact of the law on its victims, such as ethnic Chinese Buddhist Meliana.

Community-based paralegals play an important role in providing legal services for poor Indonesians. But Antoni Putra writes that a recent Supreme Court decision on paralegals could see their role curtailed, further restricting access to justice for already underrepresented communities.

When Aceh Governor Irwandi Yusuf was arrested for corruption last month, members of the public began asking if his hand would be cut off. But as Dr Dina Afrianty explains, Aceh’s Islamic Criminal Code does not cover corruption, and is primarily concerned with regulating sex.

To mark 20 years since the fall of Soeharto and the New Order regime, Indonesia at Melbourne is speaking to a range of prominent figures about their views on the reform process. Today we speak to Todung Mulya Lubis, human rights lawyer and recently appointed Indonesian Ambassador to Norway.

To mark 20 years since the fall of Soeharto and the New Order regime, Indonesia at Melbourne is speaking to a range of prominent figures about their views on the reform process. Today we speak to women’s activist Nursyahbani Katjasungkana.

To mark 20 years since the fall of Soeharto and the New Order regime, Indonesia at Melbourne is speaking to a range of prominent figures about their views on the reform process. Today we speak to Professor Jimly Assiddiqie, the former head of the Constitutional Court.

Although remarkable progress has been achieved in judicial reform since the end of the New Order in 1998, the justice sector still faces serious challenges, such as widespread judicial corruption. Rifqi Assegaf reflects on what has been achieved, and what has not, over the past 20 years.