Category: Political parties

Dr Nadirsyah Hosen, Dr Jeremy J Kingsley and Professor Tim Lindsey write that the so-called “omnibus bill” on job creation has been misnamed – it is basically about making life easier for big business.

A draft bill on the elimination of sexual violence has become a battleground for pro-democracy movements against rising religious conservatism, write Anna Margret and Yolanda Pandjaitan.

Indonesia at Melbourne will again be taking a break over the Christmas and New Year period. Here we list the most popular articles, plus a few of our favourites, from 2019. We look forward to seeing you again when we return in mid-January.

How do Indonesia’s often politically active media bosses interfere in the lives of journalists? What are the implications of Jokowi’s victory for the media? Dr Dirk Tomsa chats to Hellena Souisa in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

Giri Ahmad Taufik writes that if the Constitution is amended to give the MPR the power to produce State Policy Guidelines (GBHN), there will no longer be any doubt about democratic regression in Indonesia.

Despite an ongoing battle for reform, corruption runs rampant in Indonesia’s civil service, writes Akhmad Misbakhul Hasan.

Indonesian democracy has taken a beating over the past few days. Dr Dave McRae looks at what could be done to prevent a repeat of this week’s events in future elections.

The election is barely over, so it might seem strange to contemplate the next, but the 2019 elections signpost a significant transition that will be evident by the time Indonesia votes again in 2024, writes Donald Greenlees.

New party PSI performed particularly well among overseas voters. Dr Dina Afrianty and Dr Monika Winarnita look at why it was popular with the diaspora but failed to meet the legislative threshold at home, and what this might mean for its future.

President Joko Widodo appears to have won, but by a smaller margin than many predicted. Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir argues that preparations for 2024 could be critical for the constellation of power over the next five years.

What were the key factors in Jokowi’s apparent victory? What were the legislative outcomes? Did irregularities occur? Dr Jemma Purdey, Dr Dirk Tomsa and Dr Dave McRae discuss these issues and more in their review of the 2019 elections for Talking Indonesia.

After a long, bitter, but largely uneventful campaign, it looks like President Joko Widodo will be re-elected with about 55 per cent of the vote. University of Melbourne academics offer their early thoughts on the results.