Join Dr Dave McRae, Dr Jemma Purdey, Dr Charlotte Setijadi and Dr Dirk Tomsa as they celebrate the Talking Indonesia podcast’s 100th episode. The co-hosts revisit some of the major themes of the first 99 episodes, and look at how these issues will affect the 2019 elections.

The first three leadership debates have been derided as ‘uninteresting, stiff and scripted’. But Yoes C Kenawas writes that despite their weaknesses, the debates are important rituals for maintaining Indonesian democracy.

Why has Jokowi been able to maintain his lead in the polls so easily? What obstacles has the Prabowo campaign faced so far? Dr Dirk Tomsa discusses these and other questions with Dr Djayadi Hanan in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

For several days after the 2014 election, both Joko “Jokowi” Widodo and Prabowo Subianto claimed victory on the basis of differing quick count results. Could Indonesia see a similar debacle in 2019? Dr Dirk Tomsa has been monitoring developments in the polling sector.

President Joko Widodo has often faced claims that he is “criminalising” ulama, or religious leaders. Azis Anwar Fachrudin looks at how many religious leaders Jokowi has sent to prison, and asks, are the complaints about criminalisation missing the point?

Ahmad Syarif Syechbubakr writes that mainstream Muslim organisations have enthusiastically backed government efforts to fight intolerance because they are concerned about conservative groups’ growing popularity, not just their intolerance.

How will the 2019 elections matter to labour unions, and how can unions influence the result? Dr Dave McRae chats to Professor Michele Ford in Talking Indonesia. Look out for new episodes every week until after the elections on 17 April.

Prabowo Subianto and running mate Sandiaga Uno have said their campaign will focus on President Joko Widodo’s economic weaknesses. But Matthew Busch writes that Prabowo’s attacks have so far fallen short, even though he has plenty of material to work with.

Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir and Rafiqa Qurrata Ayun write that rather than dismissing non-voters as apathetic or irresponsible, it is far more productive to reflect on how they can contribute to strengthening democracy.

Professor Tim Lindsey writes that Jokowi’s backtracking on plans to release Abu Bakar Ba’asyir is a reminder that there are still powerful nationalist forces in government who regarded Islamist hardliners as an existential threat.

With rights on the agenda during the first debate on 17 January, expectations were high. But as Dr Ken Setiawan writes, the performance of both candidate pairs left little hope for an improvement in the human rights situation.

President Joko Widodo and running mate Ma’ruf Amin squared off against Prabowo Subianto and Sandiaga Uno in the first of five planned presidential debates on 17 January. Dr Dave McRae was watching, and presents his five key takeaways here.