Category: Security

Dr Richard Chauvel writes that exposure of racism towards Papuans has prompted a shift in the discourse about the acceptance of Papuans in Indonesia.

Why do women join extremist networks? What roles do they play in these networks? Dr Dirk Tomsa discusses these questions and more with Nava Nuraniyah in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

Are perceptions about the politicisation of law enforcement justified? How do the government and other external parties intervene in legal cases? Dr Dave McRae discusses these issues and more with Dian Rositawati in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

The struggle to convince a re-elected Jokowi government to abandon its dead-end policies in Papua will be much more difficult without the faith, vision and determination of Neles Tebay, writes Dr Richard Chauvel.

While former Muslim militants swap bullets for ballots in Central Sulawesi, a community in West Nusa Tenggara appears to be going the other way, write Ihsan Ali-Fauzi, Irsyad Rafsadie and Siswo Mulyartono.

Former militia and released terrorists have turned to democratic means to advance their agenda in Central Sulawesi, write Ihsan Ali-Fauzi, Irsyad Rafsadie and Siswo Mulyartono.

Professor Tim Lindsey writes that Jokowi’s backtracking on plans to release Abu Bakar Ba’asyir is a reminder that there are still powerful nationalist forces in government who regarded Islamist hardliners as an existential threat.

With rights on the agenda during the first debate on 17 January, expectations were high. But as Dr Ken Setiawan writes, the performance of both candidate pairs left little hope for an improvement in the human rights situation.

The conviction of Meiliana, after she complained about the noise of a nearby mosque, has shocked Indonesia. PUSAD Paramadina researchers examine Meiliana’s complaint in detail, and the violence that followed, showing how hate was mobilised to convict her.

The Indo-Pacific is slowly replacing the Asia-Pacific as the dominant security and economic concept in our region. Natalie Sambhi writes that the complex challenges of this vast region should be approached bit by bit, and Australia, India and Indonesia could start by strengthening trilateral cooperation in the region’s southwest sector, the “Indo-Australis”.

According to official government narratives, the military was forced to step in to save the nation from a coup on 1 October 1965. Drawing on her remarkable new book, Dr Jess Melvin explains how rather than reluctantly stepping in, Soeharto and the military used existing military chains of command to actively seize power.

Is the military attempting to return to Indonesian political life? How has the military been able to maintain its centrality in Indonesian society over the decades? Dr Charlotte Setijadi explores these issues and more with Dr Jess Melvin in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.