Category: Security

Data on Religious Harmony Forums (FKUB) shows that many Indonesian communities are quite capable of discussing and managing religious difference, writes Ihsan Ali Fauzi.

Unaesah Rahmah looks at how terrorists are getting hold of the weapons, and what should be done to disrupt supply.

What do the recent tensions between China and Indonesia north of the Natuna Islands tell us about the implications of China’s rise for Indonesia? Dr Dave McRae chats to Emirza Adi Syailendra in the first episode of Talking Indonesia for 2020.

2019 was a big year for Talking Indonesia. Here we present the 10 episodes that were most popular with podcast subscribers over the past year.

The Indonesian government has recently issued a decree on addressing “radicalism” among civil servants. Kate Grealy warns that vague definitions of radicalism mean there is a risk the policy could be used to silence the government’s opponents.

Dr Richard Chauvel writes that exposure of racism towards Papuans has prompted a shift in the discourse about the acceptance of Papuans in Indonesia.

Why do women join extremist networks? What roles do they play in these networks? Dr Dirk Tomsa discusses these questions and more with Nava Nuraniyah in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

Are perceptions about the politicisation of law enforcement justified? How do the government and other external parties intervene in legal cases? Dr Dave McRae discusses these issues and more with Dian Rositawati in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

The struggle to convince a re-elected Jokowi government to abandon its dead-end policies in Papua will be much more difficult without the faith, vision and determination of Neles Tebay, writes Dr Richard Chauvel.

While former Muslim militants swap bullets for ballots in Central Sulawesi, a community in West Nusa Tenggara appears to be going the other way, write Ihsan Ali-Fauzi, Irsyad Rafsadie and Siswo Mulyartono.

Former militia and released terrorists have turned to democratic means to advance their agenda in Central Sulawesi, write Ihsan Ali-Fauzi, Irsyad Rafsadie and Siswo Mulyartono.

Professor Tim Lindsey writes that Jokowi’s backtracking on plans to release Abu Bakar Ba’asyir is a reminder that there are still powerful nationalist forces in government who regarded Islamist hardliners as an existential threat.