Following their post on the recent International Women’s Day march, Dr Monika Winarnita and Gavin Height report on the Women’s March Jakarta, which saw even greater numbers turn out for action against sexual violence.

While former Muslim militants swap bullets for ballots in Central Sulawesi, a community in West Nusa Tenggara appears to be going the other way, write Ihsan Ali-Fauzi, Irsyad Rafsadie and Siswo Mulyartono.

Professor Vedi Hadiz offers his take on the Indonesian elections, writing that the long election season has rarely been about contests between outright reformers and outright reactionaries, or between outright secularists and outright Islamists.

Join Dr Dave McRae, Dr Jemma Purdey, Dr Charlotte Setijadi and Dr Dirk Tomsa as they celebrate the Talking Indonesia podcast’s 100th episode. The co-hosts revisit some of the major themes of the first 99 episodes, and look at how these issues will affect the 2019 elections.

Will Connolly, the 17-year-old who egged racist Australian Senator Fraser Anning, has been celebrated in Indonesia for defending Islam. But former Australian resident Iqbal Aji Daryono writes that this interpretation is too simplistic.

Ahmad Syarif Syechbubakr writes that mainstream Muslim organisations have enthusiastically backed government efforts to fight intolerance because they are concerned about conservative groups’ growing popularity, not just their intolerance.

Going by the first presidential debate on 20 January, neither candidate feels that the electorate cares much about human rights. Dr Robertus Robet and Dr Alfindra Primaldhi present survey results suggesting that Indonesians do believe human rights are important – but acceptance of rights has its limits.

Indonesian Solidarity Party (PSI) head Grace Natalie has been accused of blasphemy for remarks she made on shari’a-inspired local regulations. Is there now no room for non-Muslims to comment on religion in public? Daniel Peterson examines the case against her.

In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Charlotte Setijadi chats to Dr Quinton Temby about what the youth-focused revivalist movement Pemuda Hijrah and other groups like it can tell us about the type of Islam that appeals to young Indonesian Muslims.

The brutal death of Persija supporter Haringga Sirla at the hands of rival Persib supporters in September attracted national and international attention. But two months on, has anything been done to prevent further violence? Dr Andy Fuller looks at the problems plaguing Indonesian domestic football.

How much do parents’ education levels affect the schooling of their children? Senza Arsendy presents the results of a recent study showing that despite concerns over the impact of growing economic inequality, educational mobility increased from 1997 to 2015.

President Soeharto left office in 1998 amid public fury about the special treatment given to his six children. Dr Helen Pausacker writes that in the 20 years since, Soeharto’s children have seen their influence decline, but continue to live prosperous lives and have made several attempts to launch political careers of their own.