Revered journalist and writer Arswendo Atmowiloto was one of only a handful of people charged with blasphemy under the New Order. Dr Daniel Peterson reflects on his life and views on the problematic Blasphemy Law.

President Joko Widodo has often faced claims that he is “criminalising” ulama, or religious leaders. Azis Anwar Fachrudin looks at how many religious leaders Jokowi has sent to prison, and asks, are the complaints about criminalisation missing the point?

It’s time again for Indonesia at Melbourne to take a short break over the Christmas and New Year period. Here we reflect on some of our favourite and most popular blog posts and podcasts from 2018. We look forward to seeing you again when we return in mid-January.

The new Smart Pakem app is supposed to give the public a safe way to report “deviant” religious practices. But could it trigger persecution and conflict instead? Zainal Abidin Bagir weighs up the implications for religion and rights.

Indonesian Solidarity Party (PSI) head Grace Natalie has been accused of blasphemy for remarks she made on shari’a-inspired local regulations. Is there now no room for non-Muslims to comment on religion in public? Daniel Peterson examines the case against her.

Some 23 people have been sentenced under the Blasphemy Law since President Joko Widodo came to power in 2014, including six this year. Andreas Harsono from Human Rights Watch looks at the impact of the law on its victims, such as ethnic Chinese Buddhist Meliana.

The conviction of Meiliana, after she complained about the noise of a nearby mosque, has shocked Indonesia. PUSAD Paramadina researchers examine Meiliana’s complaint in detail, and the violence that followed, showing how hate was mobilised to convict her.

Why is blasphemy such a serious offence in Indonesia? What do recent blasphemy cases have in common and where do they differ? Dr Dirk Tomsa discusses these issues and more with Dr Melissa Crouch in the latest episode of the Talking Indonesia podcast.

For more than a year, the Southeast Asia Freedom of Expression Network (SAFEnet) has been tracking the so-called Muslim Cyber Army (MCA), which stands accused of spreading hoax news and hate speech online. SAFEnet Regional Coordinator Damar Juniarto presents a detailed examination of the shadowy network.

On 9 May, judges sentenced Basuki ‘Ahok’ Tjahaja Purnama to two years in prison for blasphemy, surprising many, as prosecutors had not pursued a custodial sentence. Professor Simon Butt presents a legal analysis of the decision. What arguments did the court hear and what did it accept?

The conviction for blasphemy of former Jakarta Governor Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama was not a surprise, writes Professor Tim Lindsey. What was surprising was that the judges decided to follow the usual pattern in blasphemy cases when the case before them was so very unusual.

In a decision that shocked many, judges last week sentenced former Jakarta Governor Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama to two years in prison for blasphemy. Dr Stewart Fenwick, who recently completed a book on the Blasphemy Law, writes that the case demonstrates how the law and the courts can be exploited for political and religious purposes.