Stunting due to malnutrition and other factors poses threats to Indonesia’s human and economic development. So what is the re-elected president promising to do about it? Nur Fitri Widya Astuti gives some pointers for a better way forward.

Ahead of the final debate before the election, Dr Asep Suryahadi assesses the key economic promises coming from either side.

The government has recently implemented a new school zoning policy in an attempt to reduce educational inequality. It’s a good start, writes Senza Arsendy, but more work is needed to ensure all students have access to quality education.

What could the government be doing to reduce inequality? Dr Asep Suryahadi examines the drivers and future of inequality, and suggests that despite government efforts, Indonesia may have to get used to higher levels of inequality.

How much do parents’ education levels affect the schooling of their children? Senza Arsendy presents the results of a recent study showing that despite concerns over the impact of growing economic inequality, educational mobility increased from 1997 to 2015.

Fake news and hoaxes are now a ubiquitous part of the public conversation online in Indonesia. Dr Airlangga Pribadi Kusman writes that when political engagement is based on lies or manipulated data, public participation in the political process may end up harming, rather than strengthening, democracy.

Since the 1990s, inequality has risen faster in Indonesia than in any other East Asian country except China. What is causing rising inequality, and how is the Jokowi administration addressing it? What still needs to be done? Dr Matthew Wai-Poi, from the World Bank in Jakarta, examines Indonesia’s rising divide.

Inequality in Indonesia has reached record levels. What is driving this inequality, and what does Indonesian society look like as a result? Dr Dave McRae explores these issues and more with Dr Matthew Wai-Poi in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.