The #BlackLivesMatter protests have thrown a spotlight on racism towards Papuans in Indonesia. In this weeks Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae chats to Ligia Giay about the drivers and impacts of racism against Papuans.

In the case of West Papua, racism is not only perpetrated in openly violent forms by the police or military but is also ingrained in structures and assumptions that benefit Indonesians, as well as foreigners, writes Dr Jenny Munro.

Dr Richard Chauvel writes that exposure of racism towards Papuans has prompted a shift in the discourse about the acceptance of Papuans in Indonesia.

On 16 November, police declared Jakarta Governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, or Ahok, a suspect for blasphemy over a speech he made in which he quoted a verse from the Qur’an. Why have Ahok’s comments provoked such an intense reaction in Indonesia, and what can we learn from this case about the position of non-Muslims and ethnic Chinese Indonesians in Indonesian democracy? Dr Dave McRae speaks to Dr Nadirsyah Hosen about the case.

Anti-Chinese sentiment has deep roots in Indonesian society but there is a widespread perception that it has become worse over recent years, along with the rise of Jakarta Governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, or Ahok. Dr Robertus Robet writes that as Ahok’s opponents have struggled to formulate effective criticism against him, they have resorted to unsophisticated appeals to primordial concerns.