Tim Lindsey

Tim Lindsey is Malcolm Smith Professor of Asian Law and Director of the Centre for Indonesian Law, Islam and Society at the University of Melbourne.

The exact details of what instigated the recent dispute between the Indonesian and Australian militaries remain unclear. But whatever the cause, Professor Tim Lindsey writes that the bilateral relationship is changing, and this kind of turbulence is likely to become more common.

The bizarre arrest of Perth teenager Jamie Murphy in Bali last month prompted another round of tabloid reporting about Australians whose dream Bali holiday had turned into a nightmare. But Professor Tim Lindsey writes that the image of Bali as a dangerous “Yobbo Paradise” is inaccurate. In fact, of the more than one million Australians who travelled to Bali last year, only 60 had direct contact with police over issues or charges.

Professor Tim Lindsey examines the blasphemy allegations against Jakarta Governor Basuki ‘Ahok’ Tjahaja Purnama. He writes that the case reveals two problems at the heart of Indonesian democracy: the rise of religious intolerance among Indonesia’s Muslim majority and the manipulation of that intolerance by the small group of elite politicians who dominate Indonesian politics.

Will Australia see a return to warm relations with Indonesia after Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s meeting with President Joko Widodo? Professor Tim Lindsey, director of the Centre for Indonesian Law, Islam and Society, spoke to ABC’s The Drum, about the prospects for the bilateral relationship.

When Professor Adnan Buyung Nasution died on 23 September, Indonesia lost one of its foremost thinkers on law and human rights. Professor Tim Lindsey reflects on the life and achievements of the founder of the Legal Aid Institute (LBH).

Professor Tim Lindsey speaks to Emma Alberici from the ABC’s Lateline program, about Indonesia’s decision to slash its cattle import quota, and the state of the bilateral relationship.

Myuran Sukumaran​ and Andrew Chan’s deaths were pointless. Australia’s response to the executions should focus on how to prevent this happening again, writes Professor Tim Lindsey.

President Joko Widodo could lose civil society support over his failure to defend the Corruption Eradication Commission from attacks from the police, write Professor Tim Lindsey and Associate Professor Simon Butt.

If Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran are executed, writes Professor Tim Lindsey, any response should focus on the real issue in dispute between Australia and Indonesia – criminal justice. Photo by Mia Salim, DFAT.

Professor Tim Lindsey describes how Indonesia appears determined to execute drug offenders – both foreign and local – if they are caught in Indonesia but spends money to help Indonesian drug offenders avoid execution when they are caught overseas.

Professor Tim Lindsey and Associate Professor Simon Butt comment on the Bali Nine executions and the effect that politics is having on the prisoners’ appeals. Photo by Dave McRae.

Following President Joko Widodo’s recent decision to deny clemency to Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran, Professor Tim Lindsey speaks to the Leigh Sales, from the ABC, about the remaining legal options for the Bali Nine members.