Posted in: Policy in Focus

Grading Nadiem’s education reforms

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In 2019, President Widodo appointed Nadiem Makarim, the US-educated founder of Gojek, as the Minister of Education. Four years later, the Indonesian education system looks – at least at a surface level – unrecognisable from the president’s first term. But have Nadiem’s reforms been effective? And what lays ahead for Indonesia’s next education minister?
https://flickr.com/photos/asiandevelopmentbank/14454539704/

Unpacking Indonesia’s Just Energy Transition Roadmap

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As part of its obligations under the Just Energy Transition Partnership, Indonesia released a Comprehensive Investment and Policy Plan that details a roadmap for reaching peak emissions in 2030 and becoming net zero by 2050. It was written with an eye toward making Indonesia’s renewable energy sector more attractive to private capital. But is it politically feasible?

A ‘golden Indonesia’ will need to embrace meritocracy

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The topic of meritocracy has been thrust into the spotlight again since the controversy surrounding the appointment of Indonesian President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s eldest son, Gibran Rakabuming Raka, as the running mate of presidential candidate Prabowo Subianto. If Indonesia wants to be a developed nation by 2045, it needs to get rid of nepotism and adopt the meritocratic systems of many developed nations.

What’s in a name? Terminology for Christian holidays in the spotlight

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On 12 September Muhadjir Effendy, Coordinating Minister for Human Development and Cultural Affairs, announced a change in nomenclature for Christian national holidays. The decision was made to adopt the term “Yesus Kristus”, the name of Jesus Christ used by Indonesian Christians, instead of “Isa al-Masih”, the Arabic term used for Jesus in the Qur’an. Although intended to protect Indonesia’s diverse religious traditions, the policy change reflects how easily religious policies can become a point of contestation among Indonesia’s religiously diverse communities.

Wrecked? Belitung, Indonesia and the politics of maritime heritage

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In mid-1998, as President Suharto’s regime crumbled, local fishers discovered a 9th century shipwreck in waters near Belitung Island. The Belitung shipwreck was one of the most significant – and controversial – maritime discoveries of recent times.
https://kalteng.antaranews.com/berita/327901/pemprov-beri-sanksi-pns-malas

Talking Indonesia: bureaucratic reform

The project of bureaucratic reform has now been ongoing for over 20 years. But what issues remain and what is the government doing to try and curb corruption and boost efficiency? In this episode, Dr Elisabeth Kramer speaks to Dr Kanti Pertiwi about how effective efforts to improve the bureaucracy have been.

Does Indonesia’s higher education system need a reset?

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Researchers in Indonesia are alienated from their work because they lack academic freedom, their roles reduced to ticking administrative boxes. Professor Sulistyowati Irianto believes Indonesian universities are in need of reform.

Why Australia and Indonesia should build a comprehensive partnership on climate change and the energy transition

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Indonesia is one of the most climate-vulnerable nations in the world. Richard Mathews thinks Australia should be doing more to help Indonesia make the clean energy transition.

Talking Indonesia: private sector innovation

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What spurs private sector companies to innovate in ways that cater to lower-income customers? How have governments responded to such innovation? Dr Dave McRae chats with Professor Michiko Iizuka in a special Policy in Focus episode of Talking Indonesia.

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