How has digital media created spaces for a diversity of views on issues important to Indonesian women, including sexuality and religion? What does an Indonesian ‘feminist’ publication look like? In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Jemma Purdey explores these issues and more with Devi Asmarani, chief editor of online magazine Magdalene.

How free is the Indonesian press? How does the concentration of media ownership affect journalists and audiences? And how are digital technologies transforming the media landscape? Dr Ken Setiawan chats to Dr Ross Tapsell about these issues and more in Talking Indonesia.

Indonesian reporting on the arrest of so-called celebrity prostitute Nikita Mirzani has been detailed and profuse. Hendri Yulius writes that, whether we like to admit it or not, we all gain a degree of pleasure from reading these highly sexualised reports.

A gay web series last week provoked the ire of at least one lawmaker, who called for it to be blocked and its makers dealt with in the courts. As Hendri Yulius writes, the episode was just another example of the government’s double standard in its approach to issues of sexuality.

Indonesia’s politically ambitious media moguls have not been shy of exploiting their platforms and connections in their own interests. But audiences – and voters – are not amused. Lily Yulianti Farid.

On Monday April 14, a quartet of Australia’s foremost Indonesian experts gave their views on the recent Indonesian legislative elections at a public forum at the Melbourne Law School (link is external). View video and summaries of that event here.

Indonesian voters are looking for parties that can deliver clean governance, lower corruption and address popular welfare issues, said Tim Lindsey in an interview with ABC News 24 yesterday (link is external).