Posts with tag: Democratic regression

Talking Indonesia: democratic regression and the environment

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How are post-truth politics and democratic regression affecting environmental protection in Indonesia? Tito Ambyo chats to Dr Dirk Tomsa in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

Indonesian oligarchs are defending their wealth at the cost of democracy

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President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has finally acted to quash efforts to extend his time in office beyond his constitutionally mandated two-term limit. But there is no guarantee that the oligarchs who want him to stay in power will listen.

Constitutional amendment: why now?

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Political elites are pushing to amend the 1945 Indonesian Constitution again, despite the far more pressing challenges of the Covid-19 pandemic and a complete absence of public demand for change.

Mural controversies expose the poor health of Indonesian democracy

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The repressive police response to three murals criticising the government's management of the Covid-19 pandemic is just another sign of the rapidly declining health of Indonesian democracy.

The destruction of the KPK flags the failure of democratic legal reform in Indonesia

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As depressing as it is, the destruction of the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) is not surprising. It is a sign of the limits of institutional approaches in advancing democratic legal reform in Indonesia.

Talking Indonesia: protest

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How has protest changed in the age of social media, and how has the state responded to mass protest? Are there parallels between protest movements in Indonesia and its regional neighbours? Dr Dave McRae discusses these issues and more with Dr Yatun Sastramidjaja in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

Can the omnibus law do what its drafters claim, and bring investment and jobs to Indonesia?

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Even from an investment perspective, the controversial omnibus law looks set to underdeliver, writes Ahmad Syarif Syechbubakr.

Omnibus law shows how democratic process has been corrupted

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As protests rage, legal avenues to overturn the controversial law may no longer be the answer, write Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir and Rafiqa Qurrata A’yun.

Civil society after #ReformasiDikorupsi

Dr Robertus Robet writes that while the #ReformasiDikorupsi protests of 2019 are often considered to have failed, the movement has much greater significance for the future of civil society.

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