Posted in: Top Stories

Religious freedom, harmony or moderation? Government attempts to manage diversity

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The government has recently promoted the concept of 'religious moderation' in its attempts to manage religious diversity in Indonesia. But there are several problems with the approach.

Will Islamist sentiment smother Indonesia’s ‘me too’ movement in the education sector?

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Conservative Muslim groups have confusingly argued that a new regulation seeking to protect students from sexual abuse effectively promotes any sexual acts that involve consent.

Proposed increased legislative threshold could backfire for its supporters

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Political elites are pushing to raise the legislative threshold again. But they should consider the risks and unintended potential consequences of such a proposal.

Constitutional amendment: why now?

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Political elites are pushing to amend the 1945 Indonesian Constitution again, despite the far more pressing challenges of the Covid-19 pandemic and a complete absence of public demand for change.

Anxiety, unpreparedness and distrust: Indonesia’s careful response to AUKUS

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The arrival of AUKUS has stirred anxieties about Indonesia’s strategic role in the Indo-Pacific region and its implications for trust and stability.

Islamists back at work, pushing conservative gender politics as a ‘response’ to Covid-19

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The Prosperous Justice Party's failed attempt to promote polygamy as a solution to the Covid-19 pandemic was misogynistic and displayed a belief that women and girls can only participate in society as wives.

Academic freedom: another victim of the ITE law?

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The sentencing of Syiah Kuala University lecturer Saiful Mahdi for defamation is another devastating blow to academic freedom, and freedom of expression more broadly, in Indonesia.

Obesity worsens Covid-19. It’s time for Indonesia to get serious about tackling it.

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The pandemic represents an opportunity for the government to address obesity more seriously and introduce legislation to curb access to unhealthy food and beverages.

Mural controversies expose the poor health of Indonesian democracy

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The repressive police response to three murals criticising the government's management of the Covid-19 pandemic is just another sign of the rapidly declining health of Indonesian democracy.

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