Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir

Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir is a PhD candidate at the Asia Institute, University of Melbourne.

President Joko Widodo was supported by many activists because of promises to strengthen the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK). But as Rafiqa Qurrata A’yun and Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir write, in the end he played a significant role in contributing to its demise.

President Joko Widodo appears to have won, but by a smaller margin than many predicted. Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir argues that preparations for 2024 could be critical for the constellation of power over the next five years.

Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir and Rafiqa Qurrata Ayun write that rather than dismissing non-voters as apathetic or irresponsible, it is far more productive to reflect on how they can contribute to strengthening democracy.

Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir and Rafiqa Qurrata A’yun take a look at the results of the 2018 regional elections. Rather than reflecting national-level dynamics, they write, the behaviour of political parties and politicians at the local level is defined primarily by opportunism.

Indonesian universities now have far greater institutional autonomy than they did under the New Order regime. But Diatyka Widya Permata Yasih and Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir write that real autonomy involves the freedom to take a critical stance against the interests of the state and market. And this is where Indonesian universities are struggling.

The recent Jakarta gubernatorial election saw the mobilisation of religious sentiment on a massive scale. Postgraduate students Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir, Lukman-nul Hakim and Diatyka Widya Permata Yasih look at the growing use of identity politics in Indonesian electoral democracy.

The fiercely contested Jakarta gubernatorial election has given rise to a cycle of charges and counter-charges between the Islamic Defenders Front (FPI) and its opponents. Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir and Rafiqa Qurrata Ayun write that this politicisation of criminal justice is doing serious damage to the rule of law.

Luqman-nul Hakim recently argued that the dismissal of Fahri Hamzah from the Prosperous Justice Party (PKS) indicated that the party was returning to its ideological roots. But Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir and Andi Rahman Alamsyah contend that the party’s recent political manoeuvres suggest it will continue to favour a pragmatic approach. It will need to because of its weak position in politics.