Posted in: Religion

Political repentance: can moderates ever forgive Anies?

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The vice presidential debate on 21 January garnered considerable public attention when Muhaimin Iskandar, the running mate of Anies Baswedan, borrowed the term 'ecological repentance' from Pope Francis. What does this tell us about the dynamics of religious politics in Indonesia?

Talking Indonesia: Indonesian encounters in Israel and Palestine

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Formal diplomatic relations do not exist between Israel and Indonesia so direct interactions between these two peoples are rare. Yet as Indonesia’s expanding middle classes enjoy greater access to international travel, Muslim and Christian Indonesians are increasingly visiting the holy land. Have these encounters shifted the perceptions of these pilgrims about the conflict Israel-Palestine conflict? Jemma Purdey explores this question with anthropologist Mirjam Lücking.
https://ambon.antaranews.com/berita/190443/fakta-menarik-tentang-coldplay

Coldplay controversy: Islamic hardliners driving Indonesian cancel culture

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Religious protesters and police clashed outside the Coldplay concert at Gelora Bung Karno Stadium on 16 November. Attempts to cancel public figures are becoming a common occurrence in Indonesia. But what motivates these religious hardliners leading Indonesian cancel culture?

What’s in a name? Terminology for Christian holidays in the spotlight

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On 12 September Muhadjir Effendy, Coordinating Minister for Human Development and Cultural Affairs, announced a change in nomenclature for Christian national holidays. The decision was made to adopt the term “Yesus Kristus”, the name of Jesus Christ used by Indonesian Christians, instead of “Isa al-Masih”, the Arabic term used for Jesus in the Qur’an. Although intended to protect Indonesia’s diverse religious traditions, the policy change reflects how easily religious policies can become a point of contestation among Indonesia’s religiously diverse communities.

The PKB-PKS coalition: don’t underestimate a unified Islamic community in 2024

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The union of the National Awakening Party (PKB) and the Prosperous Justice Party (PKS) under the banner of the Anies Baswedan and Muhaimin Amin presidential ticket has defied expectations. It is easy to see PKB and PKS as being at opposite ends of a traditionalist-modernist political spectrum. But when we take a longer view of history we can see these different religious orientations do not always preclude collaboration.

Talking Indonesia: pathways to extremism

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In the post-Soeharto era, terrorist acts have drawn attention through a handful of small, but committed, jihadist organisations conducting targeted bombings. In this week's episode, Elisabeth Kramer chats with guest Dr Julie Chernov Hwang about how social networks facilitate entry into and exit from jihadist groups in Southeast Asia.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rabhauke/30854273191/

The fight for Nahdlatul Ulama in 2024

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As Indonesia prepares for the 2024 general elections, Nahdlatul Ulama (NU) – the nation's largest religious organisation – finds itself in at the centre of a political tug of war as presidential candidates and political parties actively jostle for its endorsement. NU’s leaders need to keep in mind that competition for NU’s endorsement has the potential to influence not only the country's political landscape, but also the organisation itself.
https://www.antaranews.com/foto/3517761/pemeriksaan-selebgram-tersangka-kasus-penistaan-agama-di-palembang

Blasphemy cases highlight legal inconsistencies

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Indonesian social media figure Lina Mukherjee was reported to police after a TikTok video of her eating pork went viral on social media. The case highlights the inconsistent application of blasphemy laws throughout Indonesia.
Photo by Portable Soul from Flickr.

Islam and the 2024 presidential election: moving towards a consensus candidate?

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The Defending Islam rallies in 2016 and 2017 and the very polarising Indonesian presidential election of 2019 suggest the role of Islam in the 2024 election will be more significant than ever. But how will Muslims vote on election day?

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