Entries by Ahmad Syarif Syechbubakr, https://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/author/syarif/

Can the omnibus law do what its drafters claim, and bring investment and jobs to Indonesia?

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Even from an investment perspective, the controversial omnibus law looks set to underdeliver, writes Ahmad Syarif Syechbubakr.

Investment at all costs: Jokowi fails the coronavirus test

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President Joko Widodo's focus on the economy led him to initially ignore the seriousness of the coronavirus threat, writes Ahmad Syarif Syechbubakr.

The urban poor in the Jakarta riots

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Ahmad Syarif Syechbubakr writes that most analyses of the recent Jakarta riots have ignored the social situation on the ground, which provided a fertile environment for the riots to escalate.

The politics of fighting intolerance

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Ahmad Syarif Syechbubakr writes that mainstream Muslim organisations have enthusiastically backed government efforts to fight intolerance because they are concerned about conservative groups' growing popularity, not just their intolerance.

Nahdlatul Ulama and Muhammadiyah struggle with internal divisions in the post-Soeharto era

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Recent years have seen significant divisions within Indonesia's two largest Muslim organisations, Nahdlatul Ulama (NU) and Muhammadiyah. Ahmad Syarif Syechbubakr looks at the causes of these divisions and how they are affecting the organisations' religious and political positions.

Meet the Habibs: the Yemen connection in Jakarta politics

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Islamic Defenders Front (FPI) leader Rizieq Shihab is Indonesia's most prominent 'Habib' – an honorific title given to Islamic scholars who are descendants of Prophet Muhammad. Ahmad Syarif Syechbubakr traces the origins of the Habib in Indonesia and examines their influence over contemporary Jakarta politics.

Anti-Ahok protests: why were Nahdlatul Ulama and Muhammadiyah sidelined?

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The recent protests against Basuki "Ahok" Tjahaja Purnama saw groups like the Islamic Defenders Front (FPI) come to the fore, while mainstream Muslim organisations Nahdlatul Ulama and Muhammadiyah saw their influence wane. Ahmad Syarif Syechbubakr writes that NU and Muhammadiyah leaders need to rethink their approach.

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