TALKING INDONESIA PODCASTSee all


Talking Indonesia: the Indonesian diaspora

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Why do Indonesians migrate? And how do women – the majority of Indonesian migrants – maintain links with their home country? Dr Ken Setiawan speaks to Dr Monika Winarnita about these issues and more in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Q&A: Dede Oetomo on the LGBT panic

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Indonesia has seen a sustained attack on the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community over the past two months, triggered by comments made by the minister of higher education, research and technology, Muhammad Nasir. Indonesia at Melbourne spoke to the godfather of gay activism in Indonesia, Dede Oetomo, about the moral panic gripping the nation.

The Rohingya in Aceh: displaced, exploited and nearly forgotten

,
In May 2015, Indonesia agreed to provide temporary shelter for up to 3,500 Rohingya boat people, insisting that they be resettled or repatriated within a year. With this deadline fast approaching, Dr Antje Missbach reports that few have been resettled, and public goodwill is beginning to dry up.

Talking Indonesia: inequality

, ,
Inequality in Indonesia has reached record levels. What is driving this inequality, and what does Indonesian society look like as a result? Dr Dave McRae explores these issues and more with Dr Matthew Wai-Poi in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Photo essay: last drinks in Kalijodo

, ,
Jakarta bid farewell to the Kalijodo red-light district last week. The city administration had announced plans to raze the area and turn it into green space just 20 days before the bulldozers moved in. Freelance photographer Imang Jasmine was there to capture the notorious district's final moments.

The fear of communism still haunts Indonesia

,
Last week, pressure from mass organisations forced the cancellation and relocation of the Belok Kiri Fest, a cultural event that aimed to challenge dominant discourses of Indonesian history. Dr Ken Setiawan writes that the incident is the latest example of the ongoing repression of alternative discourses on leftism and the events of 1965 in democratic Indonesia.

Visions for Bandung: balancing urban dreams and socio-spatial realities

,
Bandung Mayor Ridwan Kamil has big plans for Bandung. But these plans are coming up against the informality that has shaped the city's development over many years. Anna Rowe and Amy Wu suggest an alternative approach that values informality and will ensure that all citizens – not just the middle class – can benefit from development.

Bima Arya and Hizbut Tahrir's grand plan

, ,
Indonesians were stunned earlier this month after a photo emerged of Bogor Mayor Bima Arya opening the new office of Hizbut Tahrir Indonesia (HTI), an organisation that openly rejects democracy and the Indonesian state. Burhanuddin Muhtadi looks at the movement and its strategy to revive a transnational Islamic caliphate.

Islam Nusantara: a local Islam with global ambitions?

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Indonesia’s largest Islamic organisation, Nahdlatul Ulama (NU), is promoting Islam Nusantara — its vision of an inclusive and peaceful Islam — as a counterweight to violent extremism. What exactly is meant by the concept? And what can Islam Nusantara offer the broader Muslim world? Dr Nadirsyah Hosen examines the movement.

Talking Indonesia: the Indonesian diaspora

, ,
Why do Indonesians migrate? And how do women – the majority of Indonesian migrants – maintain links with their home country? Dr Ken Setiawan speaks to Dr Monika Winarnita about these issues and more in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Q&A: Dede Oetomo on the LGBT panic

, , ,
Indonesia has seen a sustained attack on the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community over the past two months, triggered by comments made by the minister of higher education, research and technology, Muhammad Nasir. Indonesia at Melbourne spoke to the godfather of gay activism in Indonesia, Dede Oetomo, about the moral panic gripping the nation.

The Rohingya in Aceh: displaced, exploited and nearly forgotten

,
In May 2015, Indonesia agreed to provide temporary shelter for up to 3,500 Rohingya boat people, insisting that they be resettled or repatriated within a year. With this deadline fast approaching, Dr Antje Missbach reports that few have been resettled, and public goodwill is beginning to dry up.

Talking Indonesia: inequality

, ,
Inequality in Indonesia has reached record levels. What is driving this inequality, and what does Indonesian society look like as a result? Dr Dave McRae explores these issues and more with Dr Matthew Wai-Poi in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Photo essay: last drinks in Kalijodo

, ,
Jakarta bid farewell to the Kalijodo red-light district last week. The city administration had announced plans to raze the area and turn it into green space just 20 days before the bulldozers moved in. Freelance photographer Imang Jasmine was there to capture the notorious district's final moments.

The fear of communism still haunts Indonesia

,
Last week, pressure from mass organisations forced the cancellation and relocation of the Belok Kiri Fest, a cultural event that aimed to challenge dominant discourses of Indonesian history. Dr Ken Setiawan writes that the incident is the latest example of the ongoing repression of alternative discourses on leftism and the events of 1965 in democratic Indonesia.

Visions for Bandung: balancing urban dreams and socio-spatial realities

,
Bandung Mayor Ridwan Kamil has big plans for Bandung. But these plans are coming up against the informality that has shaped the city's development over many years. Anna Rowe and Amy Wu suggest an alternative approach that values informality and will ensure that all citizens – not just the middle class – can benefit from development.

Bima Arya and Hizbut Tahrir's grand plan

, ,
Indonesians were stunned earlier this month after a photo emerged of Bogor Mayor Bima Arya opening the new office of Hizbut Tahrir Indonesia (HTI), an organisation that openly rejects democracy and the Indonesian state. Burhanuddin Muhtadi looks at the movement and its strategy to revive a transnational Islamic caliphate.

Islam Nusantara: a local Islam with global ambitions?

,
Indonesia’s largest Islamic organisation, Nahdlatul Ulama (NU), is promoting Islam Nusantara — its vision of an inclusive and peaceful Islam — as a counterweight to violent extremism. What exactly is meant by the concept? And what can Islam Nusantara offer the broader Muslim world? Dr Nadirsyah Hosen examines the movement.

TALKING INDONESIA PODCASTSee all


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