Posts with tag: 1965 Violence

Is Indonesia sliding towards a 'Neo-New Order'?

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President Joko Widodo has offered little support to the Legal Aid Foundation (LBH) since the shocking attack on its offices two weeks ago. Professor Tim Lindsey writes that civil society should not expect much from Jokowi, who is in the unenviable position of having to keep the oligarchs happy and Islamist agitators at bay.

Democratic emergency? Hard-liners, communism and the attack on LBH

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The past two days have seen unprecedented attacks on one of Indonesia's oldest civil society organisations, the Legal Aid Foundation (LBH). Former LBH Jakarta director Nurkholis Hidayat says the weekend's events represent a deeply troubling new low for freedom of expression.

Indonesia at Melbourne: 2016 in review

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In our final post for 2016, we send off this rather depressing year by taking a look back at some of the expert commentary and analysis published on Indonesia at Melbourne. Thanks again for your loyal readership and support, and we look forward to seeing you again in mid-January.

Buru Island, challenging a single version of history

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Over the past few months, Rahung Nasution's film, Pulau Buru, Tanah Air Beta (Buru Island, My Homeland), has upset military officials, religious hard-liners and university authorities, who have all attempted to have screenings cancelled. Dr Airlangga Pribadi Kusman takes a look at the film that has caused such controversy.

The IPT 1965 is a historic moral intervention. Will it finally lead to action?

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Last week, the judges of the International People’s Tribunal 1965 released their final report, finding the Indonesian state responsible for crimes against humanity. But what is the standing of the IPT and what impact might its findings have? Associate Professor Katharine McGregor and Dr Jemma Purdey examine the fallout from the report's release.

Not allowed to not believe? The troubled place of atheism in Indonesia

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Although freedom of religion and freedom of expression are guaranteed in the Indonesian Constitution, these guarantees have not been sufficient to protect non-religious expression in the public sphere. Ismail Hasani looks back at the case of Alexander An, jailed for writing "God does not exist" in a Facebook post.

When books become threats: preserving 'public order' in Indonesia

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Over the past couple of weeks, security officials have confiscated books on the 1965 violence and leftist ideas to prevent what they describe as a "reawakening of communism". Hendri Yulius looks at the long history of book banning and book burning in Indonesia and examines what this recent episode means for freedom of expression in the country.

Indonesia takes a small but critical step toward reconciliation

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On 18-19 April, Indonesia held an unprecedented national symposium to discuss the violence of 1965, involving victims, activists, and government and military officials. Associate Professor Katharine McGregor and Dr Jemma Purdey present a detailed analysis of last week's events.

The fear of communism still haunts Indonesia

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Last week, pressure from mass organisations forced the cancellation and relocation of the Belok Kiri Fest, a cultural event that aimed to challenge dominant discourses of Indonesian history. Dr Ken Setiawan writes that the incident is the latest example of the ongoing repression of alternative discourses on leftism and the events of 1965 in democratic Indonesia.

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