Entries by Dina Afrianty, https://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/author/dina/, Slamet Thohari, https://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/author/amex/, Tommy Firmanda, https://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/author/tommy/, Mahalli, https://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/author/mahalli/

Can the Covid-19 pandemic boost inclusive education?

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Dr Dina Afrianty, Slamet Thohari, Tommy Firmanda and Mahalli write that the Covid-19 pandemic may force teachers to get up to speed with technology that can improve access to education for students with disabilities.

PSI, minorities and the diaspora vote

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New party PSI performed particularly well among overseas voters. Dr Dina Afrianty and Dr Monika Winarnita look at why it was popular with the diaspora but failed to meet the legislative threshold at home, and what this might mean for its future.

Child marriage: Constitutional Court finally ditches religious arguments

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The Constitutional Court recently ruled that the current marriageable age of 16 for girls was unconstitutional. Dr Dina Afrianty examines the landmark decision – a remarkably different outcome to the last time the Court heard the issue.

The power of emak-emak: empowering or patronising Indonesian women?

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Both pairs of presidential candidates are targeting women voters, and seeking to capitalise on "the power of emak-emak". Dr Dina Afrianty writes that while historically many women saw the term emak as empowering, its recent use by politicians is far less complimentary.

Aceh’s obsession with sex: why the province has its priorities wrong

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When Aceh Governor Irwandi Yusuf was arrested for corruption last month, members of the public began asking if his hand would be cut off. But as Dr Dina Afrianty explains, Aceh’s Islamic Criminal Code does not cover corruption, and is primarily concerned with regulating sex.

What does the Jakarta election result mean for the women's movement?

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Many observers have suggested that the win of Anies Baswedan in the Jakarta gubernatorial election last week has set the stage for the ongoing exploitation of religious and ethnic sentiment in Indonesian politics. According to Dr Dina Afrianty, however, most post-election analyses have failed to consider what the election result means for Indonesian women.

Why divorce doesn't work for Indonesian women

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Divorces are becoming more common in Indonesia, and women are now responsible for 80 per cent of divorce applications. Dr Dina Afrianty writes that although Indonesian law requires husbands and fathers to pay child support and maintenance after divorce, women have few avenues for redress if their former husbands don’t pull their weight.

Indonesia under pressure over female genital cutting

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Many were shocked on 6 February when Unicef reported that an estimated 60 million Indonesian women and girls have undergone genital cutting. Dr Dina Afrianty writes that although some Indonesians believe female circumcision is an important expression of religious identity, theological justification for the practice is weak.

Domestic violence in marriage: tackling the taboo

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More than a decade has passed since Indonesia passed legislation on elimination of violence against women in the home. But as Dina Afrianty writes, most women still prefer to escape abusive marriages through divorce, rather than pursue charges against their husbands.

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