Posted in: Law

Why divorce doesn't work for Indonesian women

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Divorces are becoming more common in Indonesia, and women are now responsible for 80 per cent of divorce applications. Dr Dina Afrianty writes that although Indonesian law requires husbands and fathers to pay child support and maintenance after divorce, women have few avenues for redress if their former husbands don’t pull their weight.

What explains Indonesia’s enthusiasm for the death penalty?

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Indonesia has recently seen a surge in enthusiasm for capital punishment, with public officials lining up to declare their support. How can this be explained? Are officials just responding to public demands? Nurkholis Hidayat examines Indonesia's embrace of the death penalty and looks at what it means for the justice sector.

Indonesia on trial: rights activists face backlash

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Last month, the International People's Tribunal on 1965 crimes against humanity provoked a predictably strong response in Indonesia. Associate Professor Katharine McGregor and Dr Jemma Purdey reflect on the tribunal and its consequences for the activists who participated.

Managing hate speech or muzzling freedom of expression?

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The release of a police circular on the management of hate speech has sparked fears in some quarters of a return to the restrictions on freedom of expression seen under the New Order. But as Irfan Abubakar writes, if implemented as intended, it could help to prevent religious conflict.

Regulating the bedroom: sex in Aceh's criminal code

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Late last month, Aceh began enforcing its Shari'a Criminal Code, the Qanun Jinayat. Why are legislators so obsessed with regulating sex? And does the code make it an offence to be gay or lesbian in the province, as many media outlets have suggested? Hendri Yulius takes a close look at the Qanun Jinayat.

Farewell Adnan Buyung Nasution

When Professor Adnan Buyung Nasution died on 23 September, Indonesia lost one of its foremost thinkers on law and human rights. Professor Tim Lindsey reflects on the life and achievements of the founder of the Legal Aid Institute (LBH).

Q&A: Todung Mulya Lubis on judicial reform

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Professor Todung Mulya Lubis is one of Indonesia's most respected lawyers and a champion of human rights and judicial reform. Indonesia at Melbourne spoke to Pak Mulya about the future of reform in the justice sector and the controversial Jakarta International School cases.

Missing history? Jimly Asshiddiqie on the death penalty in Indonesia

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Former Constitutional Court Chief Justice Professor Jimly Asshiddiqie has been a longstanding advocate for the abolition of the death penalty. Indonesia at Melbourne spoke to Jimly about the future of the death penalty ahead of his lecture at Melbourne Law School.

The Constitutional Court: promoting corruption?

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The former Indonesian deputy minister of justice and human rights, Denny Indrayana, writes on what the Constitutional Court got wrong in its recent decisions on regional elections and ex-convicts.

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