Posted in: Death Penalty

Indonesia at Melbourne: 2017 in review

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Indonesia at Melbourne will again be taking a short break over Christmas and New Year. In this final post for 2017, we look back at the analysis and commentary featured on the blog and podcast throughout the year. Thanks again for your loyal readership and support, and we look forward to seeing you again mid-January.

New hope for abolition of the death penalty?

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Amnesty International recently released its 2016 report on the death penalty, finding that while executions decreased in Indonesia, at least 60 new death sentences were handed down. Ricky Gunawan and Raynov Tumorang Pamintori write that while there is plenty to be concerned about, there are some encouraging signs of change.

What explains Indonesia’s enthusiasm for the death penalty?

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Indonesia has recently seen a surge in enthusiasm for capital punishment, with public officials lining up to declare their support. How can this be explained? Are officials just responding to public demands? Nurkholis Hidayat examines Indonesia's embrace of the death penalty and looks at what it means for the justice sector.

Talking Indonesia: whither the death penalty?

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What are the prospects for abolition or reduction in the use of the death penalty in the remainder of President Joko Widodo's time in office? Dr Dave McRae explores these issues with Bali Nine lawyer Professor Todung Mulya Lubis in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Missing history? Jimly Asshiddiqie on the death penalty in Indonesia

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Former Constitutional Court Chief Justice Professor Jimly Asshiddiqie has been a longstanding advocate for the abolition of the death penalty. Indonesia at Melbourne spoke to Jimly about the future of the death penalty ahead of his lecture at Melbourne Law School.

We must go beyond symbolic protests

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Indonesia can easily dismiss Australia's objections to the death penalty when it just involves Australians. But Jokowi's policies have opened the window for a more powerful multinational response, write Dr Dave McRae and Diane Zhang.

7 reasons why Bali pair should not have been killed

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Myuran Sukumaran​ and Andrew Chan's deaths were pointless. Australia's response to the executions should focus on how to prevent this happening again, writes Professor Tim Lindsey.

How will the executions affect the bilateral relationship?

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Dr Dave McRae speaks to RN Breakfast about the planned execution of narcotics prisoners in Indonesia and their impact on Indonesia's relations with Australia, and the rest of the world.

A harsh response to executions would be foolish

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If Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran are executed, writes Professor Tim Lindsey, any response should focus on the real issue in dispute between Australia and Indonesia – criminal justice. Photo by Mia Salim, DFAT.

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