Posted in: Public health

What is Jokowi planning to do about stunting?

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Stunting due to malnutrition and other factors poses threats to Indonesia’s human and economic development. So what is the re-elected president promising to do about it? Nur Fitri Widya Astuti gives some pointers for a better way forward.

Cooking under pressure: how the poor juggle food prices

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Volatile food prices make headlines during Ramadan, but poor households struggle with them year-round, writes Rachma Indah Nurbani.

It’s complicated: heterosexual relations and the spread of HIV

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Approaches to HIV elimination need to change in light of growing rates of transmission outside key populations, writes Lydia Verina Wongso.

Smoking is bad for your... campaign?

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Activists were hoping that smoking and cigarettes would be discussed during the vice presidential debate earlier this month. Dr Elisabeth Kramer writes that while the vice presidential candidates were silent on the issue, both presidential candidate teams have indicated they do have plans for tobacco control.

When disaster strikes

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Earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic explosions – 2018 was a tumultuous year for Indonesia. Madelina Ariani asks how the health sector can provide a better safety net in 2019 and beyond.

Has Indonesia forgotten contraception?

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One out of nine Indonesian adolescents are sexually active. But as Lies Marcoes writes, lack of knowledge and limited access to contraception among Indonesian adolescents is contributing to growing rates of underage marriages and unwanted pregnancies.

Indonesia at Melbourne: 2016 in review

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In our final post for 2016, we send off this rather depressing year by taking a look back at some of the expert commentary and analysis published on Indonesia at Melbourne. Thanks again for your loyal readership and support, and we look forward to seeing you again in mid-January.

Risking life and limb: preventable road deaths in North Sulawesi

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Rising incomes and easy access to credit have resulted in huge growth in the number of motorcycles on Indonesian roads. But poor attention to and enforcement of road laws has also seen a spike in traffic fatalities. The World Health Organisation estimates that more than 100 people die on Indonesian roads every day. Dr Tim Brickell examines this growing and largely preventable problem.

Should Indonesian smokers pay more for health costs?

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Indonesian smokers were worked up last month over rumours that the price of cigarettes would soon rise to Rp 50,000 (AU$5). As Dr Krisna Hort explains, the rumours originated from an article that showed that doubling the price of cigarettes would increase tax revenues to a level that could cover the current deficit in the national health insurance scheme (JKN).

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