Posted in: Religion

Religious freedom, harmony or moderation? Government attempts to manage diversity

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The government has recently promoted the concept of 'religious moderation' in its attempts to manage religious diversity in Indonesia. But there are several problems with the approach.

Will Islamist sentiment smother Indonesia’s ‘me too’ movement in the education sector?

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Conservative Muslim groups have confusingly argued that a new regulation seeking to protect students from sexual abuse effectively promotes any sexual acts that involve consent.

Terror arrests likely motivated by political, not security, considerations

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The backgrounds of the three men arrested over alleged terrorism offences on 17 November suggest their capture may be connected to government efforts to neutralise Islamist opposition ahead of the 2024 elections.

Two countries, two identities? The split lives of the Indonesian diaspora in Melbourne

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Young Indonesians moving between Indonesia and Australia struggle with language, ethnicity and belonging.

Islamists back at work, pushing conservative gender politics as a ‘response’ to Covid-19

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The Prosperous Justice Party's failed attempt to promote polygamy as a solution to the Covid-19 pandemic was misogynistic and displayed a belief that women and girls can only participate in society as wives.

Indonesian sympathy for a ‘changed’ Taliban: more harm than good

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Some Indonesian political elites and Islamic leaders have expressed rather hopeful views on the future of governance in Afghanistan under the Taliban. This could be dangerous.

What happened to social context in Indonesian films?

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Too many Indonesian films with Islamic themes present moral issues in a simplistic, black and white way that ignores the complexity of contemporary Indonesian society.

A solution to conflict over houses of worship at last?

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Conflicts over houses of worship are caused in part by a problematic legal framework – this may be about to change

Talking Indonesia: Confucianism

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Why and how did Confucianism come to be recognised as a religion in Indonesia? Who are Indonesia’s Confucians, and what does the future hold for Confucianism in the country? Dr Charlotte Setijadi chats to Dr Evi Sutrisno in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

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