TALKING INDONESIA PODCASTSee all


Farewell Adnan Buyung Nasution

When Professor Adnan Buyung Nasution died on 23 September, Indonesia lost one of its foremost thinkers on law and human rights. Professor Tim Lindsey reflects on the life and achievements of the founder of the Legal Aid Institute (LBH).

Talking Indonesia: whither the death penalty?

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What are the prospects for abolition or reduction in the use of the death penalty in the remainder of President Joko Widodo's time in office? Dr Dave McRae explores these issues with Bali Nine lawyer Professor Todung Mulya Lubis in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Remembering 1965 across generations

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Fifty years after the beginning of the 1965 violence, many children and grandchildren of those targeted also continue to feel its impact. Dr Kate McGregor examines two cultural memory projects that involve collaboration across generations and aim to crack the resilience of anti-communist versions of history.

Is reconciliation possible without an apology?

,
Wednesday will mark 50 years since the events that triggered the brutal repression of the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI) and its alleged sympathisers. Ken Setiawan writes that while political elites appear to be able to stomach the idea of reconciliation, an apology is far more contested.

Are Minangkabau women really not into politics?

, ,
The Minangkabau of West Sumatra are considered the world's largest matrilineal society. But despite the apparent high status of women in the province, there is just one woman among the 74 candidates for leadership positions in regional elections scheduled for 9 December. Minangkabau woman Dina Afrianty reports from West Sumatra.

Thank God he's not Abbott: Indonesia greets Turnbull

Malcolm Turnbull’s replacement of Tony Abbott as prime minister of Australia did not make the front pages of any of Indonesia's main papers last week. But as Agus Salim and Tim Mann write, it was clear that Indonesians will not be shedding any tears over Abbott’s downfall.

Talking Indonesia: Chinese Indonesians and China's rise

In the midst of growing anti-foreign sentiment in Indonesia, how do Chinese Indonesians perceive China’s rise, and how does it affect their position in Indonesian society? Dr Dave McRae explores these questions and more with Dr Charlotte Setijadi in Talking Indonesia.

Sexuality, censorship and dangdut

,
A gay web series last week provoked the ire of at least one lawmaker, who called for it to be blocked and its makers dealt with in the courts. As Hendri Yulius writes, the episode was just another example of the government's double standard in its approach to issues of sexuality.

Jokowi's risky anti-foreign rhetoric

During his first year in power, President Joko Widodo and several of his officials have invoked the spectre of foreigners seeking to interfere in Indonesian affairs. As Dr Robertus Robet writes, history shows that this is a strategy that bears considerable risks.

Farewell Adnan Buyung Nasution

When Professor Adnan Buyung Nasution died on 23 September, Indonesia lost one of its foremost thinkers on law and human rights. Professor Tim Lindsey reflects on the life and achievements of the founder of the Legal Aid Institute (LBH).

Talking Indonesia: whither the death penalty?

, ,
What are the prospects for abolition or reduction in the use of the death penalty in the remainder of President Joko Widodo's time in office? Dr Dave McRae explores these issues with Bali Nine lawyer Professor Todung Mulya Lubis in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Remembering 1965 across generations

, ,
Fifty years after the beginning of the 1965 violence, many children and grandchildren of those targeted also continue to feel its impact. Dr Kate McGregor examines two cultural memory projects that involve collaboration across generations and aim to crack the resilience of anti-communist versions of history.

Is reconciliation possible without an apology?

,
Wednesday will mark 50 years since the events that triggered the brutal repression of the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI) and its alleged sympathisers. Ken Setiawan writes that while political elites appear to be able to stomach the idea of reconciliation, an apology is far more contested.

Are Minangkabau women really not into politics?

, ,
The Minangkabau of West Sumatra are considered the world's largest matrilineal society. But despite the apparent high status of women in the province, there is just one woman among the 74 candidates for leadership positions in regional elections scheduled for 9 December. Minangkabau woman Dina Afrianty reports from West Sumatra.

Thank God he's not Abbott: Indonesia greets Turnbull

Malcolm Turnbull’s replacement of Tony Abbott as prime minister of Australia did not make the front pages of any of Indonesia's main papers last week. But as Agus Salim and Tim Mann write, it was clear that Indonesians will not be shedding any tears over Abbott’s downfall.

Talking Indonesia: Chinese Indonesians and China's rise

In the midst of growing anti-foreign sentiment in Indonesia, how do Chinese Indonesians perceive China’s rise, and how does it affect their position in Indonesian society? Dr Dave McRae explores these questions and more with Dr Charlotte Setijadi in Talking Indonesia.

Sexuality, censorship and dangdut

,
A gay web series last week provoked the ire of at least one lawmaker, who called for it to be blocked and its makers dealt with in the courts. As Hendri Yulius writes, the episode was just another example of the government's double standard in its approach to issues of sexuality.

Jokowi's risky anti-foreign rhetoric

During his first year in power, President Joko Widodo and several of his officials have invoked the spectre of foreigners seeking to interfere in Indonesian affairs. As Dr Robertus Robet writes, history shows that this is a strategy that bears considerable risks.

TALKING INDONESIA PODCASTSee all


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