Posts with tag: Religious freedom

Ahmadiyah mosque attack exposes challenges of peacebuilding in West Kalimantan

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Why was there only a very limited local civil society response to last year's attack on an Ahmadiyah mosque in West Kalimantan?

Religious freedom, harmony or moderation? Government attempts to manage diversity

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The government has recently promoted the concept of 'religious moderation' in its attempts to manage religious diversity in Indonesia. But there are several problems with the approach.

A solution to conflict over houses of worship at last?

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Conflicts over houses of worship are caused in part by a problematic legal framework – this may be about to change

Talking Indonesia: Confucianism

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Why and how did Confucianism come to be recognised as a religion in Indonesia? Who are Indonesia’s Confucians, and what does the future hold for Confucianism in the country? Dr Charlotte Setijadi chats to Dr Evi Sutrisno in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

A personal religious choice: regions banned from forcing students to wear headscarves

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A new joint ministerial decision banning forced religious clothing in schools has been welcomed by activists. But in an increasingly conservative society, will headscarves continue to be viewed as compulsory?

Sign of the times? Indonesia takes the (halal) cake

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It was only a matter of time before Indonesia its own controversy around cakes and religious freedom. Dr Stewart Fenwick examines the incident and looks at why it prompted such a strong backlash.

Talking Indonesia: the Indonesian Council of Ulama (MUI)

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What does the growing influence of the Indonesian Council of Ulama (MUI) mean for the future of Indonesian democracy? Dr Dirk Tomsa reflects on this issue and more with Dr Saskia Schäfer in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

Is MUI beyond reform? Don't be so sure

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If MUI is here to stay, what can be done to ensure it plays a more productive role in Indonesian democracy? Ibnu Nadzir looks at the possibilities for reforming the body.

Do Indonesians still care about human rights?

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Going by the first presidential debate on 20 January, neither candidate feels that the electorate cares much about human rights. Dr Robertus Robet and Dr Alfindra Primaldhi present survey results suggesting that Indonesians do believe human rights are important – but acceptance of rights has its limits.

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