Professor Simon Butt examines key legal issues associated with Indonesia’s first simultaneous presidential and legislative elections.

How has the Constitutional Court shaped Indonesia’s electoral systems? What were its main considerations in ruling on Prabowo’s challenge to the 2019 election result? Dr Dave McRae discusses these issues and more with Professor Simon Butt in Talking Indonesia.

The Constitutional Court will begin hearing Prabowo Subianto’s challenge to his election loss on 14 June. Professor Simon Butt takes a close look at his application.

The new Smart Pakem app is supposed to give the public a safe way to report “deviant” religious practices. But could it trigger persecution and conflict instead? Zainal Abidin Bagir weighs up the implications for religion and rights.

Over the past few months, the Constitutional Court has issued two decisions that will prevent governors and the Ministry of Home Affairs from revoking problematic local bylaws, or perda. Professor Simon Butt writes that while the decisions have yet to cause much controversy, they spell serious trouble for legal certainty and the rule of law.

Legal observers have welcomed President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s decision to select Saldi Isra to replace corruption suspect Patrialis Akbar on the Constitutional Court. Muhammad Tanziel Aziezi writes that the transparent and participatory selection process was crucial for improving public faith in the institution.

Last week, Indonesia at Melbourne spoke to former Constitutional Court Chief Justice Mahfud MD during a visit to Melbourne Law School. In this Q&A, Mahfud reflects on a number of the controversial cases that came before the court during his tenure, as well as prospects for anti-corruption and bureaucratic reform under President Joko Widodo.

Over recent months, the public has again had reason to question the quality of judges serving in the Constitutional Court. Muhammad Tanziel Aziezi, from the Institute for an Independent Judiciary (LeIP), examines the selection process for Constitutional Court judges and outlines what needs to change to ensure that Indonesia has better quality judges and, consequently, better quality decisions.

Indonesia’s Constitutional Court will today hold a fifth hearing on a legal challenge to the Criminal Code that seeks to criminalise same-sex intercourse between consenting adults. PhD candidate Daniel Peterson writes that the Court’s approach when it upheld the Blasphemy Law in 2009 suggests that the outlook for Indonesia’s LGBT community is bleak.

The former Indonesian deputy minister of justice and human rights, Denny Indrayana, writes on what the Constitutional Court got wrong in its recent decisions on regional elections and ex-convicts.