Posts with tag: Bilateral relationship

Australia has changed government for the first time in nine years. Does Indonesia care?

How has the Labor Party's victory in the Australian election on 21 May been welcomed in Indonesia?

Who will study Indonesia in the future?

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The number of Australian students studying Indonesian has fallen dramatically from its heyday in the 90s. But the growing strength of Indonesia’s universities could help establish a new way for the countries to work together.

Two countries, two identities? The split lives of the Indonesian diaspora in Melbourne

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Young Indonesians moving between Indonesia and Australia struggle with language, ethnicity and belonging.

Anxiety, unpreparedness and distrust: Indonesia’s careful response to AUKUS

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The arrival of AUKUS has stirred anxieties about Indonesia’s strategic role in the Indo-Pacific region and its implications for trust and stability.

Can Australia’s declining Indonesia literacy survive Covid-19 cuts?

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Virtual 'study abroad' programs have kept students engaged with Indonesia despite the Covid-19 pandemic. But government, universities and business need to provide students with more opportunities to continue building on their language and Indonesian expertise in Australia.

Best of 2020

Indonesia at Melbourne will again be taking a break over the Christmas and New Year period. Here we list the most popular articles and podcast episodes, plus a few of our favourites, from 2020. We look forward to seeing you again when we return in January.

Talking Indonesia: Australia-Indonesia public diplomacy

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What is the state of Indonesia-Australia relations during these times of increasing international detachment and the defunding of public diplomacy programs? Dr Charlotte Setijadi chats to Dr Elisabeth Kramer and Elena Williams in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

The IA-CEPA, ‘public morals’, and dispute settlement

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The free trade agreement between Australia and Indonesia comes into force today. Kate Thresher examines the agreement, and concerns that investors' interests could come into conflict with interpretations of 'public morals' in Indonesia.

The Australian left is known for backing Papuan independence – but it wasn’t always this way

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Dominique Tasevski examines the history of the Australian Communist Party’s problematic and inconsistent position on Indonesian control over West Papua.

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