Posts with tag: Research

Talking Indonesia: social science

, ,
Do Indonesian social scientists enjoy the freedom to conduct research on any topic of their choosing? How is their research funded, and how does the government view their work? Dr Dave McRae chats to Dr Inaya Rakhmani in a special Policy in Focus episode of Talking Indonesia.

Best of 2021

, , , , , , , , , , ,
Indonesia at Melbourne will be taking a short break over the New Year period. Here we present the articles and episodes that attracted your attention in 2021. We look forward to seeing you again in mid-January 2022!

Talking Indonesia: universities and international research collaboration

, ,
How are Indonesian universities navigating the tension between calls for greater internationalisation and an obstructive legal and visa regime? Dr Dave McRae chats to Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM) Rector Professor Panut Mulyono in a special Policy in Focus episode.

Who will study Indonesia in the future?

, , ,
The number of Australian students studying Indonesian has fallen dramatically from its heyday in the 90s. But the growing strength of Indonesia’s universities could help establish a new way for the countries to work together.

Talking Indonesia: Covid-19, economic recovery and the knowledge economy

, ,
What will Indonesia's recovery from the economic impacts of Covid-19 look like? What are the prospects for a transition to a knowledge-based economy post-pandemic? Dr Dave McRae chats to Professor Arief Anshory Yusuf in a special Policy in Focus episode of Talking Indonesia.

Talking Indonesia: eliminating dengue

,
Professor Adi Utarini from the Eliminate Dengue Project at Gadjah Mada University (UGM) was recently named one of Time magazine's 100 Most Influential People. In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Jemma Purdey chats to Professor Utarini about her research, and whether we are getting closer to eliminating dengue.

BRIN and the bureaucratisation of knowledge in Indonesia

, ,
The co-opting of knowledge production by the state has a long history in Indonesia. The establishment of the National Research and Innovation Agency (BRIN) is just the latest example.

How autonomous are Indonesian universities?

,
Indonesian universities now have far greater institutional autonomy than they did under the New Order regime. But Diatyka Widya Permata Yasih and Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir write that real autonomy involves the freedom to take a critical stance against the interests of the state and market. And this is where Indonesian universities are struggling.

We acknowledge and pay respect to the Traditional Owners of the lands upon which our campuses are situated.

Phone:13 MELB (13 6352) | International: +(61 3) 9035 5511
The University of Melbourne ABN:84 002 705 224
CRICOS Provider Code:00116K (visa information)