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How widespread is corruption within the Indonesian police? What power do illicit funds afford the institution? And what are the prospects for reform under President Joko Widodo and new Indonesian Police Chief Tito Karnavian? In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Dave McRae discusses these issues and more with Dr Jacqui Baker, from Murdoch University.

Indonesia’s Constitutional Court will today hold a fifth hearing on a legal challenge to the Criminal Code that seeks to criminalise same-sex intercourse between consenting adults. PhD candidate Daniel Peterson writes that the Court’s approach when it upheld the Blasphemy Law in 2009 suggests that the outlook for Indonesia’s LGBT community is bleak.

Arcandra Tahar lasted just 20 days in cabinet, with the revelation that he also held US citizenship ending his stint as minister of energy and mineral resources. The former deputy minister of law and human rights, Professor Denny Indrayana, looks at the administrative errors that were made, and asks whether the incident will finally lead to action on multiple citizenship in Indonesia.

Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s contrasting approach to foreign policy compared to his predecessor, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, stands to reshape Australia-Indonesia ties. In this public lecture, Dr Evi Fitriani charts President Joko Widodo’s distinct approach to foreign policy and outlines the implications for Indonesia’s relationship with Australia.

Last month, Jakarta Governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama disappointed many of his supporters when he announced that he would run as a party-backed candidate in the 2017 election. Dr Dirk Tomsa takes a look at Teman Ahok, the volunteer group that campaigned for the governor to run as an independent. What’s next for Teman Ahok, now that its reason for being no longer exists?

Divorces are becoming more common in Indonesia, and women are now responsible for 80 per cent of divorce applications. Dr Dina Afrianty writes that although Indonesian law requires husbands and fathers to pay child support and maintenance after divorce, women have few avenues for redress if their former husbands don’t pull their weight.

How free is the Indonesian press? How does the concentration of media ownership affect journalists and audiences? And how are digital technologies transforming the media landscape? Dr Ken Setiawan chats to Dr Ross Tapsell about these issues and more in Talking Indonesia.

President Joko Widodo’s economy-focused cabinet reshuffle on 27 July has been described as evidence of his growing talent for managing political relationships. But as Matthew Busch writes, while the reshuffle might be a political success, it should not be assumed the gloss extends to the economy.

Over the past few months, Rahung Nasution’s film, Pulau Buru, Tanah Air Beta (Buru Island, My Homeland), has upset military officials, religious hard-liners and university authorities, who have all attempted to have screenings cancelled. Dr Airlangga Pribadi Kusman takes a look at the film that has caused such controversy.

President Joko Widodo appointed a new cabinet on 27 July, adding nine new faces. Burhanuddin Muhtadi writes that the reshuffle was a pragmatic move aimed at consolidating his now broad ruling coalition and providing him with greater freedom to implement his priority programs. He might appear to be playing it safe, Burhanuddin says, but this strategy is not without risks.

Last week, the judges of the International People’s Tribunal 1965 released their final report, finding the Indonesian state responsible for crimes against humanity. But what is the standing of the IPT and what impact might its findings have? Associate Professor Katharine McGregor and Dr Jemma Purdey examine the fallout from the report’s release.

What are the drivers and impacts of high smoking prevalence in Indonesia? What steps could the government take to control tobacco, and what arguments are made within Indonesia for and against these measures? Dr Dave McRae discusses these issues and more with Abdillah Ahsan, from the University of Indonesia, in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Vicky Prasetyo became a national laughing stock in 2013 when he introduced a unique vocabulary of buzzwords into Bahasa Indonesia. Dr Manneke Budiman writes that his ungrammatical and meaningless expressions are representative of a style of speech that has become more common in the 18 years since Soeharto fell.

Indonesia has recently seen a surge in enthusiasm for capital punishment, with public officials lining up to declare their support. How can this be explained? Are officials just responding to public demands? Nurkholis Hidayat examines Indonesia’s embrace of the death penalty and looks at what it means for the justice sector.

Husni Kamil Manik’s leadership of the General Elections Commission (KPU) was marked by a commitment to openness and transparency, which played a critical role in securing the disputed 2014 presidential election result. Titi Anggraini reflects on his achievements following his sudden death on 7 July.

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