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The size and complexity of Indonesia’s fast approaching 2019 elections means unfairness is an ever-present threat in all aspects of the process. Titi Anggarini, the director of the Association for Elections and Democracy (Perludem), runs through some of the most pressing concerns.

More than ever, Indonesia’s young people are playing a key role in the country’s politics. In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Jemma Purdey speaks to Indonesia Solidarity Party candidate Rian Ernest about his political beliefs and what motivated him to get into politics.

Indonesia is still basking in the success of the 2018 Asian Games and Asian Para Games. Slamet Thohari writes that while Indonesia deserves the plaudits it received, the Games also served to highlight outdated attitudes to people with disability.

How much do parents’ education levels affect the schooling of their children? Senza Arsendy presents the results of a recent study showing that despite concerns over the impact of growing economic inequality, educational mobility increased from 1997 to 2015.

What more could Indonesia be doing to mitigate the risk and impact of major natural disasters? In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Dave McRae speaks to disaster management experts Professor Kuntoro Mangkusubroto and Dr Rahmawati Husein.

Some 23 people have been sentenced under the Blasphemy Law since President Joko Widodo came to power in 2014, including six this year. Andreas Harsono from Human Rights Watch looks at the impact of the law on its victims, such as ethnic Chinese Buddhist Meliana.

IndonesiaLeaks made waves recently following the release of an explosive report detailing the alleged destruction of evidence at the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK). What is IndonesiaLeaks? Is it connected to Wikileaks? How does it generate its reports? Eni Mulia explains.

Indonesia has been widely criticised for its decision to limit the involvement of foreign aid personnel in the response to the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Palu, Central Sulawesi. Ashlee Betteridge writes that Indonesia is doing the right thing by restricting access.

One out of nine Indonesian adolescents are sexually active. But as Lies Marcoes writes, lack of knowledge and limited access to contraception among Indonesian adolescents is contributing to growing rates of underage marriages and unwanted pregnancies.

In the first post in our new Policy in Focus series, Dr Ward Berenschot presents research looking at how common clientelism really is in Indonesia. A survey of more than 500 experts found that perceptions of clientelism varied considerably, and the character of local economies played an important role.

Although opportunities for education remain limited for people with disability in Indonesia, some Islamic universities have taken steps to improve accessibility. In Talking Indonesia, Dr Dirk Tomsa chats to Dr Dina Afrianty about what pushed them to act, and the likelihood that others will follow.

What does the 1965 violence have to do with Ratna Sarumpaet? Hellena Souisa examines two incidents that demonstrate how serious the problem of hoaxes has become for Indonesian politics.

It is more than a week since Central Sulawesi was struck by an earthquake and tsunami that has already claimed the lives of more than 1,500 people. We spoke to local resident Adriany Badrah about the recovery effort and how local people are coping.

Is a hard-line approach the best way to deal with religious intolerance? Is there a more nuanced way to address the problem? Dr Charlotte Setijadi chats to Dr Sandra Hamid about rising intolerance towards religious minorities in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

Both pairs of presidential candidates are targeting women voters, and seeking to capitalise on “the power of emak-emak“. Dr Dina Afrianty writes that while historically many women saw the term emak as empowering, its recent use by politicians is far less complimentary.

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