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Luqman-nul Hakim recently argued that the dismissal of Fahri Hamzah from the Prosperous Justice Party (PKS) indicated that the party was returning to its ideological roots. But Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir and Andi Rahman Alamsyah contend that the party’s recent political manoeuvres suggest it will continue to favour a pragmatic approach. It will need to because of its weak position in politics.

Thousands of residents were evicted from North Jakarta coastal region of Pasar Ikan last month, the latest community to be relocated under Jakarta Governor Ahok. While many Jakarta residents have praised Ahok for his efforts to transform the capital, Dicky Pelupessy writes that we should be mindful of the disruptive experience of displacement for evictees.

Over the past couple of weeks, security officials have confiscated books on the 1965 violence and leftist ideas to prevent what they describe as a “reawakening of communism”. Hendri Yulius looks at the long history of book banning and book burning in Indonesia and examines what this recent episode means for freedom of expression in the country.

Despite the many problems of its domestic leagues, Indonesia has a strong and passionate football fan culture. Who exactly supports football and in what ways? What can be done to improve the game, for supporters and players? Dr Ken Setiawan discusses these issues and more with Dr Andy Fuller in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

The Instrument Builders Project was a collaborative initiative that ran from 2010-2014 and involved Australian and Indonesian artists from a diversity of practices and backgrounds. Program co-curator Kristi Monfries reflects on the role of collaboration and experimentation in the artistic process.

The shocking gang-rape and murder of a 14-year-old girl in Bengkulu has galvanised the Indonesian public. PhD candidate Hannah Loney looks at the case and how Indonesian feminists and activists used online spaces to draw critical attention to the issue of sexual violence in the country.

In February, President Joko Widodo passed a regulation aimed at accelerating the implementation of the One Map policy, which is designed to harmonise all sectoral maps from government agencies into a single map to prevent overlapping claims to land. But as Nanang Indra Kurniawan writes, unless customary claims to land are included, the process is bound to fail.

In 2014, Indonesia launched its comprehensive national health care scheme, the JKN. What impact has it had during its first two years of operations? What policy challenges is the government facing? Dr Dave McRae discusses these issues and more with Professor Hasbullah Thabrany and Professor Laksono Trisnantoro in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Nearly 2 million Australians watched Indonesian-born sisters Tasia and Gracia Seger take out the final of My Kitchen Rules on 26 April. Indonesia at Melbourne spoke to the girls about their approach to cooking and their views on the Australia-Indonesia relationship.

Jokowi was produced by a decentralised democratic system in which negotiation, including with oligarchs, was necessary for advancement. But now that he is president, he finds that he has nothing to bargain with except his personal popularity. As Professor Vedi Hadiz writes, negotiating with oligarchy may end up eroding the popularity Jokowi needs to negotiate with them in the first place.

On 18-19 April, Indonesia held an unprecedented national symposium to discuss the violence of 1965, involving victims, activists, and government and military officials. Associate Professor Katharine McGregor and Dr Jemma Purdey present a detailed analysis of last week’s events.

Indonesian cinema is beginning to make a mark on the world stage, with dozens of films competing in international festivals over recent years. What are the main challenges faced by Indonesian filmmakers? How can these problems be addressed, and what moves, if any, has the government made to strengthen the industry? Dr Ken Setiawan discusses these issues and more with Dr Gaston Soehadi in the latest Talking Indonesia podcast.

Nine women from Central Java captured the nation’s attention last week when they encased their feet in cement blocks and demanded to meet President Joko Widodo. Hendri Yulius writes that despite the subordination of women in Indonesian society, women and mothers have on several occasions been key drivers of social change.

After weeks of speculation, the Prosperous Justice Party (PKS) confirmed in early April that it had dismissed outspoken lawmaker Fahri Hamzah. PhD candidate Luqman-nul Hakim looks at the broader political implications of the move and what it means for PKS’s position in the Red and White Coalition (KMP).

The Sun, the Moon and the Hurricane, the debut feature from emerging Indonesian director Andri Cung, has won acclaim for the raw and beautiful performances of its young cast. Indonesia at Melbourne spoke to Andri before his arrival in Melbourne, where the film is screening at the Indonesian Film Festival 2016.

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