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One out of nine Indonesian adolescents are sexually active. But as Lies Marcoes writes, lack of knowledge and limited access to contraception among Indonesian adolescents is contributing to growing rates of underage marriages and unwanted pregnancies.

In the first post in our new Policy in Focus series, Dr Ward Berenschot presents research looking at how common clientalism really is in Indonesia. A survey of more than 500 experts found that perceptions of clientalism varied considerably, and the character of local economies played an important role.

Although opportunities for education remain limited for people with disability in Indonesia, some Islamic universities have taken steps to improve accessibility. In Talking Indonesia, Dr Dirk Tomsa chats to Dr Dina Afrianty about what pushed them to act, and the likelihood that others will follow.

What does the 1965 violence have to do with Ratna Sarumpaet? Hellena Souisa examines two incidents that demonstrate how serious the problem of hoaxes has become for Indonesian politics.

It is more than a week since Central Sulawesi was struck by an earthquake and tsunami that has already claimed the lives of more than 1,500 people. We spoke to local resident Adriany Badrah about the recovery effort and how local people are coping.

Is a hard-line approach the best way to deal with religious intolerance? Is there a more nuanced way to address the problem? Dr Charlotte Setijadi chats to Dr Sandra Hamid about rising intolerance towards religious minorities in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

Both pairs of presidential candidates are targeting women voters, and seeking to capitalise on “the power of emak-emak“. Dr Dina Afrianty writes that while historically many women saw the term emak as empowering, its recent use by politicians is far less complimentary.

What does the strengthening of conservative voices in Indonesia mean for sexual orientation and gender identity and expression? What part is this debate likely to have in the 2019 elections? Dr Jemma Purdey discusses these issues and more with Dr Sharyn Graham Davies in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

The conviction of Meiliana, after she complained about the noise of a nearby mosque, has shocked Indonesia. PUSAD Paramadina researchers examine Meiliana’s complaint in detail, and the violence that followed, showing how hate was mobilised to convict her.

Much has changed in the political landscape since Joko “Jokowi” Widodo faced off against Prabowo Subianto in the 2014 Presidential Election. In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Dave McRae talks to Associate Professor Marcus Mietzner about how these changes might affect the 2019 presidential race.

Community-based paralegals play an important role in providing legal services for poor Indonesians. But Antoni Putra writes that a recent Supreme Court decision on paralegals could see their role curtailed, further restricting access to justice for already underrepresented communities.

Indonesians were stunned over the weekend by photos of kindergarten students dressed as violent extremists. Lies Marcoes writes that while the choice of costume was disturbing, the fact that something like this could happen in an Indonesian kindergarten was not a surprise.

What does the trade and investment relationship between China and Indonesia actually look like? Will the issue of Chinese investment damage Jokowi’s electoral prospects? Dr Charlotte Setijadi discusses these issues and more with Dr Siwage Dharma Negara in the latest episode of Talking Indonesia.

President Joko Widodo surprised many when he selected Islamic cleric Ma’ruf Amin as his vice presidential running mate. Dr Budhy Munawar Rachman looks at Ma’ruf’s record at the Indonesian Council of Ulama (MUI) and writes that if the pair are elected, things could become a lot worse for religious minorities.

When Aceh Governor Irwandi Yusuf was arrested for corruption last month, members of the public began asking if his hand would be cut off. But as Dr Dina Afrianty explains, Aceh’s Islamic Criminal Code does not cover corruption, and is primarily concerned with regulating sex.

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